Weekly Bird Report


The Weekly Bird Report with Mark Faherty can be heard every Wednesday morning at 8:45am and afternoon at 5:45pm.

Mark has been the Science Coordinator at Mass Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary since August 2007 and has led birding trips for Mass Audubon since 2002. He is past president of the Cape Cod Bird Club and current member of the Massachusetts Avian Records Committee.

Eric Ellingson goo.gl/59eKJe / goo.gl/cefU8

With Hurricane/Tropical Storm Jose finally in the rear view mirror, it’s time to assess how birds were impacted by this strange, lingering storm. When hurricanes approach us from the south, there are a few things that can happen. As I mentioned last week, if the storm remains strong and hits us directly, it can pick up all kinds of Caribbean seabirds along the way, potentially carrying them well inland if the storm makes landfall and tracks west.

Brandon Trentler goo.gl/4XvaVp / goo.gl/sZ7V7x

With a few days of stormy weather ahead of us, it’s time to talk about birds and hurricanes. Here in the northeast, hurricanes originating in the Caribbean typically weaken into tropical storm before we see them, sparing us most of the destruction, and setting up potentially exciting times for birders on the Cape.

Mark Faherty

With the summer nesting season behind us, it’s the time when bird researchers turn their collective gaze upon bird migration, and the many mysteries it holds. Right here on Cape Cod, scientists are studying bird migration using a variety of methods, from the high tech and cutting edge to good, old-fashioned, 19th century trapping and monitoring methods – and sometimes both at the same time.

Say what? Say’s Phoebe! That’s what birders were saying last week when an uber rare flycatcher from the west made an appearance at Mass Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary.

Mark Faherty

A wonderful bird is the pelican,
His bill will hold more than his belican,
He can take in his beak
Enough food for a week
But I'm damned if I see how the helican!

So goes the most famous limerick that Ogden Nash never wrote. 

Mark Faherty

Shoreline swarms of seabirds known as shearwaters have long-time Cape birders searching their vocabularies for superlatives in recent weeks. If you’ve been on a whale watch recently, especially out of Provincetown, you may also have noticed the impressive shearwater flocks blanketing the in-shore waters along both Long Point and Race Point.

Richard Bonnett goo.gl/p63Bnq / goo.gl/cefU8

Are there monsters in your barn? For property owners on the Outer Cape, the answer in recent years has increasingly been “yes.” I’m talking about categorically ugly, hissing, projectile vomiting monsters. But don’t call the Ghostbusters just yet, because these monsters have an important role to play in our ecosystem. They are Turkey Vultures, and they are nature’s morticians.

JessicaLee-Photography goo.gl/bQbFsA / goo.gl/cefU8

Some reverse snow birds are visiting the Cape from Florida this week. Two White Ibises have taken up a temporary residence at Mass Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, representing only the fifth ever record for the Cape and Islands.

doevos bit.ly/2uvu4dr / bit.ly/1jNlqZo

As we pass the midpoint of meteorological summer and start that accelerating roll to Labor Day, it’s time to check in on what’s happening out there in the bird world.

I will admit that I routinely neglect our South Coast friends in my bird reports, but not this time. And that’s because something unusual is afoot (or should I say a-wing?) at the famed Gooseberry Island in Westport.

Mark Faherty

I don’t know if you’ve heard, but there’s a world champion in town, and I don’t mean that Brady and Belicheck are visiting their respective Cape and Islands summer homes. The world champion of all animal migration has made an improbable visit to the outer beaches of Cape Cod. 

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