Weekly Bird Report


The Weekly Bird Report with Mark Faherty can be heard every Wednesday morning at 8:45am and afternoon at 5:45pm.

Mark has been the Science Coordinator at Mass Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary since August 2007 and has led birding trips for Mass Audubon since 2002. He is past president of the Cape Cod Bird Club and current member of the Massachusetts Avian Records Committee.

Mark Faherty

While monitoring shorebirds on Mass Audubon’s Tern Island in Chatham last week, I came across an individual bird that illustrated the hemispheric scope of bird migration, and shed some light on the struggles of a threatened Arctic nesting shorebird population.

OHFalcon72 goo.gl/3DNltw / goo.gl/cefU8

For a few glorious days last week, we had spring. Or was it summer? It felt like we went from March to August in one day. Such is Cape Cod in spring. But with the warm weather came the long awaited fallout of May migrants—the warblers, tanagers, grosbeaks, and even shorebirds that we only get for a few weeks each May.

Maark Faherty

As the dust continues to settle after Mass Audubon’s statewide fundraiser and epic birding blitz known as Bird-a-thon, we team captains are tallying the results to submit to headquarters. At stake is the vaunted Brewster Cup, awarded to the sanctuary reporting the most species in the 24-hours of Bird-a-thon.

Courtesy Elora Grahame

It’s almost mid-May, which means two things – songbird migration is nearing its most colorful apex, and Mass Audubon’s Bird-a-thon is almost here.  It’s not a coincidence that these two things, well, coincide.

wildcarecapecod.org

This month is a busy month for birds in our region. Many birds are sitting on eggs and some babies are hatching. Mark Faherty, ornithologist and science coordinator at Mass Audubon's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary joins Mindy Todd on The Point. We also talk to Stephanie Ellis from Cape Cod Wild Care and get advice about what to do if you find a baby bird on the ground, and other wildlife protection tips.

Timor Nagy goo.gl/BxM9mu / goo.gl/uk4xos

The snowbirds are back. No, not your neighbors—they won’t be back from Florida until June. I’m talking about the flood of migrant and locally nesting birds that are returning daily from southern wintering grounds. If you’re an aficionado of bird migration, this is the golden hour. 

Keenan Yakola

I talk a lot on the Bird Report about relatively obscure seabirds that you can see if you trudge your way out to Race Point, a potentially four mile round trip in soft sand. Perhaps you don’t find the prospect of jaegers, alcids, and shearwaters enticing enough to make the trip. 

Mark Faherty

In last week’s report I griped about our typically cold and wet spring weather here on the Cape and Islands. I submit that it was a direct result of this griping that we then enjoyed nearly a week of atypically warm, sunny early spring weather. You’re welcome.

Laura Gooch goo.gl/jSp3Gw / goo.gl/lrxVf4

April is the month on the Cape and Islands where spring starts to tease us. While we get some token 50 degree days, we’re forced to chuckle at the reports of 70 or even 80 degree weather from the Boston news stations – those mainlanders know a different kind of spring than we do. Their trees leaf out weeks earlier than ours, which are held back by the cold, wet embrace of the ocean water surrounding us. 

Lots of migrant birds are back, including osprey. They're busy with courtship and nesting and can be found by the observant birder listening for their calls. On The Point, Mark Faherty, ornithologist and science coordinator at Mass Audubon's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary joins Mindy Todd to share the latest Bird News as spring arrives finally on the Cape, Coast and Islands. 

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