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Scott Bennett / MBL

Four Decades to Nail Down Contagious Clam Cancer

Contagious cancer is rare, thankfully. Until recently, there were only three documented examples, none of them in humans (again, thankfully) - a facial tumor in Tasmanian devils, a sexually transmitted cancer in dogs, and a hamster cancer. Earlier this year, researchers added one more to the list: a contagious leukemia that affects soft-shelled clams (a.k.a. steamers). It was an announcement born of four decades of research. The disease, which fills the blood with "cannonballs" of cancer...
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The arrival of the Labor Day Weekend and September, the perfect month, is the stuff of dreams for birders. This month has everything. Such as; typically fantastic weather, all species of birds migrating with their respective populations at an annual peak, the possibility of getting hit by the “great undeveloper” a.k.a. a big hurricane, and the potential for any bird to arrive on Cape and Island shores from anywhere. This month is full of promise and invariably delivers the goods.

An interview on The Point with author and historian Tom Dresser about his latest book Martha’s Vineyard: A History. The book summarizes early Island history, and focuses on 20th century Island life, including hurricanes, the filming of Jaws, presidential visits, and much more. Mindy Todd hosts. 

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For the 2015 Martha’s Vineyard International Film Festival  a selection of films from around the globe by international filmmakers are being screened. The films are drawn from top-notch festivals like Sundance, Berlin, and Cannes, with a few surprises thrown in.

Boston Public Library / flickr / CC2.0

I walked up Higgins Hollow in North Truro this morning, a fine old crease of a road tucked away in a glacial valley between two large hills. On my left I passed an old house with a large front porch where a piece of literary history took place in 1920.  That summer the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay was vacationing there with her family. 

White cross jellyfish on a Maine beach reported using Twitter hashtag #Mainejellies.
Trina Stephenson

Science-based weather forecasting dates back some 150 years, and we've grown used to detailed, daily predictions of temperatures, precipitation, winds, and clouds. But nowhere in all those forecasts is there anything about the arrival of lobsters or jellyfish in nearshore waters, or the number of ticks and mosquitos one might encounter.

J. Junker

With suicide rates for teens on Cape Cod and the Islands more than double than the state average, and that of adults 1 and 1/2 times higher, suicide prevention has become a public health priority. Organizations around our region are working to raise awareness about the prevalence of suicide and resources available to those impacted by it.

Captain Mike Orbe sells more oversized fish each year than many fisherman will catch in a lifetime. But his fish won't be winding up on the dinner table. Mike’s fish are wooden carvings, ranging between two and eight feet long. His most popular carving? The white sperm whale. 

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If you walk down by the water right now along almost any dock or jetty, it's likely you’ll see schools of tiny fish swimming around. Seems like they’re everywhere this time of year. As a category, they're called baitfish, and they have a big impact on our late-summer fishing.

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WCAI News Director Sean Corcoran hosts a discussion about the top local news stories of the week. Joining him this week are George Brennan of the Cape Cod Times; Jim DeArruda at the New Bedford Standard-Times; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; and Nelson Sigelman of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

Ann Froschauer/USFWS

White Nose Syndrome is a disease responsible for unprecedented mortality in hibernating bats. Martha’s Vineyard may be one of a few places in the Northeast where White Nose Syndrome hasn't infected bats or the places they hibernate.

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