Stijn Nieuwendijk / flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

It’s seed ordering time again. While the cold blows in under the doors and through cracks in the windows, the catalogs pour in through the mail. And it’s time to start thinking about this year’s gardens. What are we going to plant? Well, together with his wife, Peter Staaterman runs Longnook Meadows Farm in Truro, and he has an idea.

Bryce Mullet / flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

When the howling winter wind is piling snow drifts across your driveway, you might find it therapeutic to think about that iconic sign of the eventual change of seasons, the first robin of spring. In that case, I have some good news for you - the robins are already here! 

Three Harbors Site Assessment document

Nantucket Sound will soon become home to one of a handful of artificial reefs in the state.

Harwich officials worked with the state's fisheries department to select material from the old Harwich High School to make the reef, which will sit in piles along the mostly sandy seafloor. The goal is to attract fish and boost recreational fishing.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Biologist Mark Rousseau of the state's Division of Marine Fisheries to learn more.

USFWS/Ann Froschauer

White Nose Syndrome is a disease responsible for unprecedented mortality in hibernating bats. Martha’s Vineyard may be one of a few places in the Northeast where White Nose Syndrome hasn't infected bats or the places they hibernate.

Josh Reynolds/AP

The greatest art heist of all time remains unsolved, but in his new book Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest Art Heist author Steven Kurkjian reveals that a small-time gangster may have masterminded the audacious 1990 robbery of $500 million worth of masterworks from Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Kurkjian was an inv

cardcow.com bit.ly/1Qa5M9i

At a recent dinner with old friends, someone brought up the topic of the “Target Ship.” For over a half a century, the target ship was a familiar and legendary sight in Cape Cod Bay for those of us who lived near the elbow of the Cape. 

Christin Khan / NOAA

In just a few decades, we’ve gone from hunting whales to protecting them. But many are still endangered, and they face a barrage of potential threats. Now, researchers are developing new ways to study these animals, from facial recognition software to help track whales’ movements, and using baleen to trace the history of stress in whales’ lives.

Photo by CCS under NOAA Permit

How do you study the diet and eating habits of seals? As they hunt in the open water, it’s almost impossible to see what they’re putting into their mouths. 

But there is another way.

Martha's Vineyard Times

WCAI News Director Sean Corcoran hosts a discussion about the top local news stories of the week with area journalists. Joining Sean this week are Patrick Cassidy of the Cape Cod Times; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Joshua Balling of the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror; Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette; Ryan Bray of the Falmouth Enterprise; Jim DeArruda of the New Bedford Standard Times; and Nelson Sigelman of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

commons.wikimedia.org

In 2007 the ancient Maya city of Chichen Itza in Yucatan, Mexico, was named one of the New Seven Wonders of the World. A popular tourist destination, this archaeological site once belonged to Edward Herbert Thompson (1857-1935) of West Falmouth, Massachusetts!  Evan Albright has written a book, part biography, which investigates how Thompson, an archaeologist who had owned and explored Chichen Itza for nearly half a century, made one of the greatest archaeological discoveries in North America. Mr.

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