www.bournepolice.com

On The Point, we discuss efforts to improve relations and open dialogue between the community and police. The high profile police related deaths of unarmed black men in the U.S. has sparked protests and widened a rift between communities of color and the police. The Cape and Islands is not immune to these issues; there are many living here who fear the police because of the color of their skin. There are others who fear police might uncover their immigration status, and some whose struggles with addiction or mental illness make them fearful of police. What can be done to improve the relations with the police in our community? Mindy Todd hosts the discussion.

lighthouseantiques.net / goo.gl/VTEBxY

Last week, talking about the Clay Pounds, I mentioned that, despite their dramatic appearance and the significant part they played in the Cape’s maritime history, relatively few people visit the Clay Pounds today.  The problem is one of access. 

NASA shows how the ozone hole has recovered and how its recovery is expected to continue.
NASA / http://bit.ly/2yORtd5

Most of the time, the headlines are full of bad news. That’s especially true of environmental headlines. But Susan Solomon of MIT says we have a track record of environmental success stories that deserve more attention. 

W.W. Norton & Company

Social media doesn't work perfectly. And sometimes it gets things really wrong. 

In recent years, greenhouse gas emissions have actually dropped in developed countries. Europe and China are setting more abitious goals for the future.
Elsa Partan

The EPA has released its four-year plan and there’s no mention of climate change. Plus, they’ve officially begun the process of rescinding the Clean Power Plan. It’s the latest step in the Trump administration’s efforts to undo Obama-era climate policies. 

The Clean Power Plan was the Obama administration’s approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the face a GOP-controlled Congress opposed to climate legislation. So, is its rollback the end of U.S. action to address climate change? 

Fado is Life

Oct 16, 2017
Patrick T. Power

New Bedford is well-known for its vibrant Portuguese cultural scene; more than half of its residents claim Portuguese ancestry. What’s less well-known is New Bedford’s place in the world of fado, the music known as the “Soul of Portugal.” The city is home to two of America’s most established Fado performers, Ana and Jose Vinagre.

Statues supporting signs at the March for Science in Washington, D.C.
Heather Goldstone / WCAI

The March for Science brought thousands of scientists and science enthusiasts into the streets and sparked debates about social justice and the role of scientists in democracy. Six months later, Washington Post's Speaking of Science blog is asking what - if anything - has changed:

Have you altered anything about your life or work? Have your colleagues? Do you feel part of a “global movement”? Do you think the March for Science achieved its goals?

Dan Tritle

WCAI News Director Steve Junker hosts a roundup of some of the top local and regional news of the week. His guests include Gwenn Friss of the Cape Cod Times; Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Andy Tomolonis of South Coast Today; Ann Wood of the Provincetown Banner; and George Brennan of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

On The Point, a conversation between author Jessica Shattuck, whose grandparents were members of the Nazi party, and Rachel Kadish, whose grandparents survived the Holocaust.

What can descendants of perpetrators and victims learn from each other, and from the past? How can the lessons from WWII help us address the nationalism, racism and anti-semitism we see today? 

On The Point, we talk with Denise Kiernan, author of The Girls of Atomic City. It's the true story of the top-secret World War II town of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the young women brought there unknowingly to help build the atomic bomb. Mindy Todd hosts.

 

 

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