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On Nantucket, Specialty Manufacturing Is Alive And Well

Nantucket might be the last place many people would associate with manufacturing. But the island does have a rich manufacturing past -- a history largely unknown to people who come here on vacation. Specialty manufacturing is alive and well on Nantucket, and two of these homegrown operations welcome seasonal visitors as a way to spread the word about their products. Cisco Brewers is tucked away in a complex of small buildings near the center of the island. During the last 20 years, the...
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At Jenni Bick Bookbinding in Vineyard Haven, Juliette Bittner and Lauren Clark are sewing books together, punching holes through the leather covers and sticking pages in. The papers are all different colors and textures. Some are lined, others are printed.

"They have a variance of pages that you can write on and draw on and glue things into," said Bittner, who has worked here since she moved to the island five years ago.

Putneypics / flickr

So what's an eager spring fisherman to do?

Those busy southwest winds kept up most of this past week. For recreational anglers edgy to get out on the water searching for newly arrived striped bass, it has been a bit of a torment. Those 20mph+ gusts can take a lot of the fun out of small craft and kayak fishing. It's not so easy to cast and reel when you're being pitched from gunwale to gunwale, never mind trying to hold your boat's position up close to those big rocks.

Brian Morris/WCAI

Almost two weeks ahead of schedule, the Gay Head Lighthouse began its ultra-slow-motion journey to a new location 134 feet from its former site --  and well back from the eroding cliff-side. Amid the din of heavy construction equipment – and a news helicopter and drone overhead – spectators watched as the first stages of the three-day move unfolded. 

Brian Morris/WCAI

The move of the iconic Gay Head lighthouse on Martha’s Vineyard got underway late this morning, about two weeks ahead of schedule. The 400-ton brick structure, which had stood just 46 feet from the eroding cliffs, is expected to reach its new foundation, 134 feet away, by Saturday.

seangannet.com

No passport needed: Canada to California, Paris to Provincetown . . .  Michael Cunningham and Adam Gopnik are the tour guides. 20 Summers at the Hawthorne Barn in Provincetown brought these two authors, a Pulitzer prize–winning novelist and a New Yorker writer, together on stage for the first time.

Elspeth Hay

The other day I was shopping for leeks at the Orleans farmers’ market. I noticed that some vendors had leeks with a lot of green on the stems and others had leeks with more white. Peter Fossel runs Swan River Farm in Dennisport and knows a lot about leeks. He’s something of a gardening guru—he wrote the book Organic Farming: Everything You Need to Know, and is the former editor of Country Journal.

Brian Morris/WCAI

Nantucket might be the last place many people would associate with manufacturing. But the island does have a rich manufacturing past -- a history largely unknown to people who come here on vacation. Specialty manufacturing is alive and well on Nantucket, and two of these homegrown operations welcome seasonal visitors as a way to spread the word about their products. 

NOVA / WGBH

After months of preparation, workers are ready to move the Gay Head Lighthouse on Martha's Vineyard away from its spot above the picturesque cliffs of Aquinnah. The lighthouse has been in the same location since 1856, serving as a crucial navigation aid for local mariners. But the cliffs are eroding, leaving the lighthouse a mere 46 feet from the edge. On Thursday the Gay Head Light begins a slow-motion journey to a new, safer home.

Wikimedia Commons

The Memorial Day Weekend, just passed, did not disappoint for birders or for outdoor activities. Historically one of the best weekends of the year for birds, it lived up to its lofty expectations. Most exciting and unexpected was the discovery of a species of tropical duck called a Black-bellied Whistling Duck. They used to be called Black-bellied Tree Ducks as they do spend lots of time in trees but they also whistle while most species of whistling ducks do not spend time in trees. Black-bellied Whistling Ducks routinely perch and nest in trees.

On The Point, Mindy Todd interviews Jill Erickson, reference librarian at Falmouth Public Library and author Peter Abrahams about books on baseball and why baseball has such a great literary history.  Even Virginia Woolf had a favorite baseball novel.

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