Chatham Historical Society

In May, 1915, a German U-boat sank the ocean liner Lusitania, killing almost 1,200 people and causing great alarm throughout the U-S shipping industry, where vessels were suddenly vulnerable up and down the Atlantic seaboard. The government responded by setting up a series of air stations along the east coast to defend against the growing threat. One of these facilities was built on a flat, 20-acre site in North Chatham.

There are about 100 Blue Chromis fish in the great ocean tank at New England Aquarium
Wiki Commons

We wouldn’t have guessed it, but it’s awfully hard to get a certain little blue Caribbean fish to breed. In fact, it took an expert at the New England Aquarium a year of work to set up the right combination of mood lighting, tank feng shui, and a never-ending buffet of gourmet fish food to make it happen.

Lead biologist Monika Schmuck had two baby Blue Chromis fish at the end of all that work. It was the first time anyone in the world had successfully bred Blue Chromis in captivity.

“Today I actually got four more, so that’s a total of six,” she told WCAI.  

Poetry Sunday: Ashley Gong

13 hours ago

Ashley Gong reads her poem, "Speak."

Wikimedia Commons

WCAI's Sean Corcoran hosts a roundup of local stories with journalists from across the region. Joining Sean this week are Gwenn Friss of the Cape Cod Times; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Jim DeArruda of the New Bedford Standard Times; Joshua Balling of the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror; and Barry Stringfellow of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

The U.S. is a country of immigrants who often re-created a tangible piece of their homeland in the kitchen: Italian sausage, German Schnitzel, Jewish Kugel. On The Point, we talk about the influence of immigrant cuisine on American foods and food traditions. 

Ali Berlow

Allen Healy and his wife Caitlin Jones run Mermaid Farm and Dairy in Chilmark with their brood: two boys and a couple of border collies, who mostly keep the herds of sheep and cows in line - the pigs, too, if and when they get out - and any people who come by the farmstand for vegetables, grains, yogurt, lassis, raw milk, cheese and meat.

Given how controversial genetically modified corn is, it's no wonder that the prospect of genetically modifying humans pushes a lot of people's buttons. But we already have gene therapies, and new technologies are making it faster, safer, and less expensive to modify the human genome in a range of ways. That has the science community and policymakers scrambling to set responsible guidelines for the use of genome editing.

The last weekend of February brings a confluence of good-time opportunities, with the Academy Awards on Sunday, and Mardi Gras next Tuesday.  There's also ice skating on Martha's Vineyard, and the Constitution gets a highlight in Chatham.  Here's your weekend outlook.

Mark Faherty

When it comes to late winter on Cape Cod, and the knowledge that beach weather is still four months away, it’s the little signs of better things to come that keep you going. If you are paying attention to the birds around you every day, you should be brimming with hope, because they clearly are, too.

Speakers at the Stand Up For Science Rally in Boston's Copley Square.
Heather Goldstone / WCAI

For decades, scientists have shunned direct involvement in politics. They’ve testified before Congress and provided scientific information to policymakers, of course. But most have avoided weighing in on specific policy moves out of concern that such opining could damage scientists' credibility as the source of objective, factual information. In the wake of the 2016 election, that seems to be changing.

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