On The Point, a discussion about denial. From rationalizing and blaming to outright lies, we examine a range of behavior that people engage in.  Psychiatrist Dr. Marc Whaley and psychologist Dr. Michael Abbruzzese join host Kathryn Eident in the studio.

Michele Lamberti

The small sandpipers known as “peeps” are the bane of beginning beach birders everywhere. Easily overlooked as they scurry around on beaches and mudflats, these mousy, gray-brown shorebirds seem to offer little to the casual observer of birds. But taking the time to sort through them can bring fame and fortune to anyone with the requisite patience and aptitude. O-K, maybe not fortune, but two local birders did earn some serious bragging rights recently thanks to their sharp eyes and their peep knowledge.

J. Junker

Tips and tricks for getting the most out of your late summer garden, whether you grow vegetables or flowers.  WCAI's Kathryn Eident hosts entomologist and garden expert Roberta Clark, and takes listener questions.

goo.gl/JqobbW / goo.gl/KxOKu

August, 2000. The other evening, we drove out to White Crest Beach—well named with its high, bare, white shoulder of a dune cresting the hill, and several foot trails creased into its flanks leading down to the shore and the surf.

The report says the Northeast will be strongly impacted by climate change.
Elsa Partan

A climate science report leaked to the New York Times this past week presents some unsettling warnings, both about our changing weather and our current political climate. That report is part of the fourth National Climate Assessment. These assessments are intended to provide guidance to lawmakers and officials – from federal to local.

Nevena Zubcevik is at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital
Texas Lutheran University http://bit.ly/2w3MQKH

Dr. Nevena Zubcevik is a brain injury researcher and co-director of the new Dean Center for Tick Borne Illness at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, which focuses on treating the long-term effects of Lyme disease. She is also an instructor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School, an attending physician at Spalding and Massachusetts General Hospital. We spoke to her in August 2016 about her work and we are replaying a shorter version of that program below.

Wouldn’t it be fascinating to go back 30,000 to 50,000 years and meet the humans and Neanderthals who walked the earth? So many mysteries would be answered about how they lived and what their societies were like. We can’t talk to them, but maybe we can hear some of their music.

Archeologists have been studying ancient bone flutes of humans from that era and making reconstructions that can played, at least in the right hands.

Poetry Sunday: J. Lorraine Brown

Aug 13, 2017

J. Lorraine Brown reads her poem "Why I Never Learned to Play the Piano."

goo.gl/7G1SDX

WCAI News Director Steve Junker hosts a roundup of some of the top local and regional news of the week. His guests include Chris Lindahl of the Cape Cod Times; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette; Josh Balling of the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror; Ed Miller of the Provincetown Banner; and George Brennan of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

David/Flickr / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

More than 60,000 patients in the U.S. receive general anesthesia every day. But despite the fact that anaesthesia drugs, like ether, have been around for more than 150 years, it's really only been in the past decade or so that we've gained a better understanding of how they work.

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photo by Lisa Jo Rudy