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On Nantucket, Specialty Manufacturing Is Alive And Well

Nantucket might be the last place many people would associate with manufacturing. But the island does have a rich manufacturing past -- a history largely unknown to people who come here on vacation. Specialty manufacturing is alive and well on Nantucket, and two of these homegrown operations welcome seasonal visitors as a way to spread the word about their products. Cisco Brewers is tucked away in a complex of small buildings near the center of the island. During the last 20 years, the...
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No passport needed: Canada to California, Paris to Provincetown . . .  Michael Cunningham and Adam Gopnik are the tour guides. 20 Summers at the Hawthorne Barn in Provincetown brought these two authors, a Pulitzer prize–winning novelist and a New Yorker writer, together on stage for the first time.

Elspeth Hay

The other day I was shopping for leeks at the Orleans farmers’ market. I noticed that some vendors had leeks with a lot of green on the stems and others had leeks with more white. Peter Fossel runs Swan River Farm in Dennisport and knows a lot about leeks. He’s something of a gardening guru—he wrote the book Organic Farming: Everything You Need to Know, and is the former editor of Country Journal.

Brian Morris/WCAI

Nantucket might be the last place many people would associate with manufacturing. But the island does have a rich manufacturing past -- a history largely unknown to people who come here on vacation. Specialty manufacturing is alive and well on Nantucket, and two of these homegrown operations welcome seasonal visitors as a way to spread the word about their products. 

NOVA / WGBH

After months of preparation, workers are ready to move the Gay Head Lighthouse on Martha's Vineyard away from its spot above the picturesque cliffs of Aquinnah. The lighthouse has been in the same location since 1856, serving as a crucial navigation aid for local mariners. But the cliffs are eroding, leaving the lighthouse a mere 46 feet from the edge. On Thursday the Gay Head Light begins a slow-motion journey to a new, safer home.

Wikimedia Commons

The Memorial Day Weekend, just passed, did not disappoint for birders or for outdoor activities. Historically one of the best weekends of the year for birds, it lived up to its lofty expectations. Most exciting and unexpected was the discovery of a species of tropical duck called a Black-bellied Whistling Duck. They used to be called Black-bellied Tree Ducks as they do spend lots of time in trees but they also whistle while most species of whistling ducks do not spend time in trees. Black-bellied Whistling Ducks routinely perch and nest in trees.

On The Point, Mindy Todd interviews Jill Erickson, reference librarian at Falmouth Public Library and author Peter Abrahams about books on baseball and why baseball has such a great literary history.  Even Virginia Woolf had a favorite baseball novel.

Brian Morris

At Mass Automation in Bourne, a team of eight or so engineers and skilled workers custom-build machines that have never been made before. It's a business built on innovation.

"We design and build custom equipment," said company president John Fraser. "A lot of it for medical and pharmaceutical type applications. Johnson and Johnson might come to us with a new surgical sponge that they've designed, and we'll design a machine to automate making that sponge."

Robert Finch

One of the most widespread and fascinating phenomena to be found on the cliff face of the outer beach is what I call sand-leaves, or sand-pseudopods. These are distinct, ropy strands of sand and clay that flow down the face of the cliff and expand at the bottom into a bulbous, organic shape. Eerily organic in appearance, these leaves of sand can form almost anywhere and at any time of the year, though they are most common on uniformly sandy scarps interrupted by horizontal clay layers.

  If you were asked to name a musical duo that has performed at the Presidential Inauguration, played at 3 NFL Superbowls, and collaborated with the likes of P. Diddy, Tom Petty, Aerosmith, Aretha Franklin, and The Eagles – you might be scratching your head.

That musical duo is called Black Violin. Their music combines elements of pop, blues, hip-hop, classical – and more.  They’re appearing at the Zeiterion Theater in New Bedford Friday, May 29.

On The Point, Mindy Todd interviews John Murelle and William Merrill about the music of two seminal figures in the history of Broadway, George Gershwin and Vernon Duke.

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