Kathryn Eident

Learning a new language has long been a requirement at most American high schools. While the typical offerings include Spanish, French, and Latin, in Mashpee, a small group of students is taking on a language that hasn’t been spoken fluently in centuries. WCAI’s Kathryn Eident has more on the Wôpanâak Language class at Mashpee High School.

On The Point, Director of Editorial Mindy Todd and News Director Steve Junker check in with our listening audience, to get feedback about WCAI's programming. We hear praise and complaints, along with requests and suggestions about the schedule and content of our broadcasts.

Steven Pinker bit.ly/2DyRpRK

Today I want to talk a bit about the “wrack line,” that more or less continuous line of debris left on the beach by the previous high tide. The content of the wrack line can be meager and ordinary – just a few bits of seaweed – or overwhelming and dramatic, like the 40-foot carcass of a dead humpback whale that washed up at Newcomb Hollow several years ago. But if we only investigate the content of the wrack line, big or small, I think we miss the bigger question. 

creativecommons.org

Economists have long suspected that the Olympics can induce a feel-good effect that results in an economic boost. But a new study suggests there’s something else going on, as well.

NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS

We’ve known for a decade or more that there is water, albeit frozen, on Mars. Now, a new analysis of satellite images reveals the whereabouts of eight substantial ice deposits. The US Geological Survey has published the findings in the journal Science, saying that there’s ice under a third of the surface of Mars. Some of the ice is just a few feet below the surface, while other deposits are under 300 feet of rocks and dust. This is important information for those who are working on sending humans to Mars.

Fredrik Ohlander bit.ly/2FZe72W

New England’s fishery managers have released a sweeping new plan for managing the ocean ecosystems off New England’s coasts. Habitat Omnibus Amendment 2 has been fourteen years in the making and, as with any new fishing rule, it’s been controversial, with critics among the fishing industry and environmental advocates.

 

It has also been hailed as a groundbreaking application of ocean science.

 

Western University Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry

Pro Football Hall of Famers are among those touting a new Flag Football Under 14 campaign, highlighting the risk of a degenerative brain disorder called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. CTE is caused by repeated head trauma, and it can cause memory loss, aggression, and eventually, dementia. There’s currently no treatment or cure. The only sure prevention is to avoid repeated hits to the head, as in tackle football.

 

Art and Motorcycles: Alternative painkillers

Jan 22, 2018
photo by Rachel Ishigawa

Fall off your bike, get a band aid. Have a headache, take an ibuprofen. Pain is often fleeting…and there’s a cure. But what happens when pain is constant with no quick fix?  Fibromyalgia is talked about a lot more lately and that's thanks to celebrities like Lady Gaga  Morgan Freeman and Sinead O’Connor  sharing their stories. North Falmouth based artist, Terie Michon is also trying to get the word out. She’s developed her own pain relieving routine that’s anything but the norm.

In Truro Attic, Discovery of a Trove of Hopper Drawings and Diaries

Jan 22, 2018
Stephanie Guyer-Stevens

Edward Hopper is probably Provincetown’s most famous artist, but until a few years ago, not many of his works could be found on the Cape.  The Provincetown Art Association and Museum had one watercolor—by his wife, Jo—and a couple of Edward’s sketches from art school. Then one day Museum Director Chris McCarthy’s phone rang.

Poetry Sunday: Ashley Gong

Jan 21, 2018

 

Ashley Gong reads her poem, "Winter on the Cape."

 

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