Featured on WCAI

Kat Sampson

Wampanoag Indians Continue Burn-and-Scrape Method to Build Mishoon Canoes

Long before the Mayflower landed in Plymouth Harbor in 1620, Wampanoag Indians were building and using dugout canoes called mishoons. Darius Coombs is the Director of Wampanoag and Eastern Woodlands Specialized Programing and Training at Plimoth Plantation. “This is how you got around back then,” Coombs said. “There were no horses seen around this area probably not until the 1630s or 40s. So, how you got around was you’d either walk, run, or use your boats. The rivers were considered to be...
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Gonzalo Viera Azpiroz / flickr / CC2.0

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of singing in another concert with the Outer Cape Chorale. Over the past 14 years director Jon Arterton and the Chorale have presented a wide variety of choral music, from Bach to the Beatles. This most recent concert was one of their most challenging.  It was also one of their most “sacred” concerts.

paulapoundstone.com

25 years ago comedienne Paula Poundstone climbed on a bus and traveled across the country, stopping in at open mic nights at comedy clubs as she went. A high school drop-out, she went on to become one of the great humorists of our time. You can hear her as a regular panelist on NPR’s popular weekly news quiz show, Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me.

dreamreader.net

David McCullough is often referred to as the master of narrative history and is the recipient of two Pulitzer prizes and two National Book Awards. His previous books include 1776 and John Adams. His latest book brings to vivid life two of the most iconic figures in American History, The Wright Brothers.  He joins Mindy Todd on the phone from New York for an interview on The Point.

Ernest Everett Just
Wikimedia Commons

Earnest Everett Just is considered the first African-American marine biologist. Born in Charleston, SC, in 1883, he went on to study at Dartmouth College and University of Chicago. He led the zoology department at Howard University, published more than seventy scientific papers and two books, and made pioneering contributions to our understanding of fertilization and egg development.

But those accomplishments did not come without costs. While many of the challenges Everett faced were unique to his race and time, others are more persistant, and universal.

Kat Sampson

Long before the Mayflower landed in Plymouth Harbor in 1620, Wampanoag Indians were building and using dugout canoes called mishoons. Darius Coombs is the Director of Wampanoag and Eastern Woodlands Specialized Programing and Training at Plimoth Plantation.

“This is how you got around back then,” Coombs said. “There were no horses seen around this area probably not until the 1630s or 40s. So, how you got around was you’d either walk, run, or use your boats. The rivers were considered to be the highways."

Drumming Out PTSD

Jul 6, 2015
Jonathan Earle

Dave Brown, a Vietnam War veteran, lived with undiagnosed PTSD for decades. Instead of getting help, he dealt with the lingering stress of combat by staying really, really busy – working multiple jobs, raising a family, and mastering hobby after hobby. Most of those hobbies came and went, except one – drumming. 

Luyen Chou / flickr / CC2.0

Fishing is a seasonal pursuit. And as any vegetable gardener can tell you, it's important to have a strategy for how to preserve each season's abundance, to enjoy it in later times when the season is past.

So you hooked into plenty of bluefish? You brought home a small haul of sea bass? What are your options when you've caught enough fish that you want to save some for another day?

Unfortunately tragedy is part of life; from earthquakes and terrorist attacks to sickness and injury, humans have dealt with tragedy throughout the ages. Some handle it better than others, and some don’t just survive; they seem to grow in ways not previously imagined before the tragedy. Seeking to understand why, David Feldman and Lee Daniel Kravetz interviewed over 100 survivors of tragedies as well as psychologists and psychiatrists.

Elspeth Hay

Helen Miranda Wilson grows five kinds of mint and each one has a story. The first comes from her mother’s close friend Nina Chavchavadze, who moved a piece of the plant from her garden in South Wellfleet to Helen’s family property in 1946.

Heritage Museums and Gardens

The Wyeth family is sometimes referred to as the First Family of American Art.  Andrew, his father NC, and his son Jamie- three generations of painters.  Heritage Museums and Gardens has brought them together in a summer long exhibit titled The Wyeths: America Reflected.  Wanda Corn, the Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor Emerita in Art History at Stanford University, joins WCAI's Mindy Todd to discuss the Wyeth family and some of the pieces in

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