Wellfleet Historical Society

Explaining nature to children is different from speaking to adults about science.  In this Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch remembers showing school children a herring run, and laments the restraint that now overlays so much of our experience of science.

Ivanka Trump appeared at a campaign event with her father just weeks before her third child was born. Trump has proposed a federal paid parental leave policy.
Marc Nozell / Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

Women are well-represented in the early stages of academic science, and even outnumber men in some Ph.D. programs. But when it comes to the most senior jobs in science, men still outnumber women, sometimes by more than two to one. Could Ivanka Trump's paid parental leave proposal help stem the loss of women from science?

Nathaniel Philbrick, Nantucket author of the bestsellers In the Heart of the Sea and Mayflower, joins Mindy Todd on The Point to talk about his recent nonfiction book entitled Valiant Ambition. The story takes us into the middle years of the American Revolution and the tragic relationship between George Washington and Benedict Arnold. This program is recorded and aired originally in June 2016.

Healthcare workers during the West African Ebola oubreak.
Image Courtesy: European Commission DG ECHO / Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic

Ebola is back. The virus killed more than 11,000 people between 2014 and 2016. It was the largest Ebola outbreak ever documented. Now, health officials say there’s a new outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Officials are reporting four deaths and more than thirty suspected cases of Ebola in the past two weeks. They are also monitoring more than 400 individuals who came into contact with those patients. Still, because the area is so remote, officials say the risk of the outbreak spreading beyond national borders is low to medium.

Commercialization of scientific advances won't happen in Russia under Vladimir Putin, according to Prof. Loren Graham.
Wikicommons / http://bit.ly/2pEjZdf

Nearly 60 years ago, the Russians were the first to put a satellite into space. They were the ones to beat in the space race. But the collapse of the Soviet Union brought about the near collapse of Russian science, and it hasn’t recovered since.

A New Life in Ice

May 22, 2017
Schuyler Swenson

Chip Koser of Mashpee is a professionally trained chef who has worked in a number of famous restaurants. But Chip spends less time in kitchens and more time in freezers. Schuyler Swenson brings the story of a man who found a new life in ice sculpting.

This piece comes from production partners Atlantic Public Media, through their media training program, the Transom Story Workshop in Woods Hole.

JEB Williams

Colin Williams reads his poem, "scraping shovel echo."

Center for Coastal Studies

The skeleton of a 35-foot whale is being installed for public display at the Center for Coastal Studies in Provincetown. It’s not just any whale, either. It's the skeleton of an 11-year-old humpback that researchers followed from when she was a calf. 

Wikimedia Commons

WCAI News Director Sean Corcoran rounds up the top local news stories of the week with several area journalists. Joining Sean this week are Geoff Spillane of the Cape Cod Times; Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Jim DeArruda of the New Bedford Standard Times; Ann Wood of the Provincetown Banner; Joshua Balling of the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror; and George Brennan of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

Eric Baetscher, WikiCommons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mass_statehouse_eb1.jpg

The State legislature is moving closer to agreeing on a budget for next fiscal year, but they'll have to deal with unstable tax revenue receipts as they figure out how to spend taxpayers' $40 billion.

Kathryn Eident talked with WCAI's State House reporter Mike Deehan, who's been been keeping an eye on Beacon Hill, to learn more.

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