According to the US EPA, roughly a third of the trash we create is packaging, and most of that comes from food. A few years ago, Elspeth Hay started wondering why we use so much packaging to keep and transport our food. She learned about a woman named Bea Johnson in California whose family produces only a pint of trash a year, and got inspired to try to reduce the amount of packaging her own family was bringing home.

iihs.org

Driving is dangerous for everyone, but statistically teens and older drivers are involved in more crashes and highway fatalities than any other age group. On The Point, we talk about the reasons why, and explore ways we can make the driving safer for everyone. 

goo.gl/8X9zf5

On a recent Saturday morning at Cape Cod Community College, a handful of theater students kicked back in their seats and read through their lines. The Tilden Arts Center production is an adaptation of George Orwell's 1984, the novel that for many was ahead of its time when it was published in 1949. The post-war tale foreshadowed a darker, more sinister era when a nation feared for its liberties under the eye of government surveillance and control. 

Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen's Alliance

The Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance is launching an effort this summer to try to get consumers to develop a taste for two under-appreciated fish species.

Jim Kelly bit.ly/2nPwRbZ / bit.ly/1mhaR6e

When I was a weird little birder kid growing up in the wilds of Brockton, the Common Raven was an almost mythical bird to me. They lived in wilderness areas, like the big woods of northern Maine, where I assumed they soared around over densely forested hills looking for deer carcasses or whatever it was they ate. Or maybe they only hung around haunted houses and dark castles where they kept company with murderous madmen.

Wikispaces

On The Point, we discuss a new book: Trauma and the Golden Lady, The Life and Death of Sylvia Plath.  It explores Plath’s struggle with depression, how trauma in her early and adult life may have contributed to her suicide, and the mental health system during the 1950’s and 60’s. Our guest in the studio is clinical psychologist Bob Fournier, who specializes in suicide counseling. Mindy Todd hosts.

www.screenagersmovie.com

On The Point, we discuss the new documentary ScreenAgers that sheds light on the impact of increased screen time on the developing brain and explores coping strategies for families.  Guests on the program are Shelia House, Harwich Youth Service Coordinator; Sharon Stark, Chatham Youth Services Coordinator; and Dr. Michael Abbruzzese, psychologist.

Kenneth C. Zirkel bit.ly/2o0qlyj / bit.ly/1SrbRBk

Old stone walls are one of the emblems the New England landscape.  They're the legacy of the glaciers that sculpted the land. Robert Finch reflects on the effort it takes to build a stone wall, and on the messages that stone walls seem to convey to us over time, in this week's Cape Cod Notebook.

Crocuses sprang up with February's warmth, but got frozen in March.
Elsa Partan

For the start of spring, we thought we’d look back at the wacky weather we’ve been having over the past two months. Like the 71-degree Fahrenheit day in Boston on February 24, which set the record for the warmest day for that city for the month of February. Or the February 27th tornado in Western Massachusetts. Or the radical swing to arctic temperatures in March.

The FlavoRx pilot study provided at-risk patients with prescriptions worth $30 at a farmer's market.
Francie Randolph / Sustainable CAPE

We all know that we’d be healthier if we ate more fruits and vegetables. Your doctor may have suggested that. But few of us actually do anything about it. But would that change if you actually got a prescription that covered the cost of fresh, locally-grown produce? That was the question at the heart of a recent pilot project on Cape Cod, called FlavoRx.

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