WCAI News

Brian Morris

Charles “Stormy” Mayo is one of the founders of the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, an organization well known for its pioneering whale research and other types of ocean science. But Stormy Mayo is also an avid boat builder – so avid, in fact, that he’s been building a schooner in the small side yard of his Provincetown home on and off for the last 38 years. And today, that schooner was finally ready to be taken from that side yard to its new home in the waters of Cape Cod Bay. Reporter Brian Morris was there and has this report.

Photo by Don Cuddy

The Charles W Morgan is currently undergoing sea trials off New London, as America’s only surviving whaler prepares for this month’s cruise to New Bedford and Vineyard Haven. Harbor Master Mike Cormier says it was the buzz generated by the Morgan’s restoration that resulted in the lamp’s rediscovery.

WCAI/Brian Morris

On Route 28 in Yarmouth -- a Cape Cod thoroughfare lined with taffy shops and seafood-themed restaurants -- is a large hulk of a building long past its heyday that most everyone agrees needs to go away. But not so long ago, this eyesore was known as the Mill Hill Club. It was an entertainment venue, and back during the 1970s and ‘80s, the club was as good a reason to come to Cape Cod as the beaches. But this Tuesday morning, town officials and representatives from the business community began smashing at it with sledgehammers. And then the bulldozer took over.

Major Demographic Shifts Hit Nantucket Schools

May 27, 2014
Jason Graziadei

It’s a Tuesday morning at Nantucket Elementary School.  Buses are arriving. Students and teachers are streaming into the main lobby preparing for another day of classes.

These are the sights and sounds of a typical Massachusetts elementary school. Except, not quite. 

In years past most of southeastern Massachusetts was farmland - livestock dotted every field. Nowadays pressure from business and residential development has consumed large tracts of open space. But farm life has not disappeared entirely from Fairhaven. In fact, along with Littleton, Whatley and Swansea, the town still hosts a livestock auction that is a lot more than a remembrance of things past.

“We’ve been doing auction,” said Richie Costa. “This October will be eleven years.”

Costa and his wife Donna own one of the few remaining family farms in town.

Wikimedia

By the 1830s, almost all of the large hardwood trees in Massachusetts had been cut down.

Ten years ago, not one state in the nation allowed same-sex couples to marry. Now 18 states do, including Arkansas, which joined that group yesterday.

Massachusetts was the first. And tomorrow marks ten years since gay and lesbian couples were allowed to tie the knot.

WCAI’s Elsa Partan has the story of one Cape Cod couple who sued the state and won the right to marry.

Since then, they’ve watched as bans on gay marriage around the country have fallen and failed.

Brian Morris/WCAI

About 150 people packed a Plymouth hotel function room, including numerous Pilgrim workers who wore buttons saying “I support Pilgrim Station – safe and secure.” Barbara Gaedke, an Administrative Assistant at Pilgrim for 34 years, said the plant is safe.

“And I think a lot of people are fearful of nuclear, and so they hear ‘accident’ or anything that’s out of the ordinary and they become afraid. But I think if you knew the people that work there, and if you knew how safe it is, it’s less fearful,” Gaedke said.

Brian Morris/WCAI

At dusk on a recent Saturday, Professor Alan Hirschfeld and one of his grad students calibrate the large telescope inside the UMass/Dartmouth observatory. They’re setting up for a public astronomy night, a monthly event the University co-hosts with the Astronomical Society of Southern New England, or ASSNE. Hirschfeld said the telescope was designed and built by UMass students in the 1980’s, and went online in the early 90’s. It has a 16-inch diameter, or aperture.

Courtesy photo

It’s the last week of commercial scalloping season on Nantucket, and Max Perkins is shoveling snow out of his dad’s scallop boat at the Children’s Beach boat ramp.

The recent spring blizzard had kept the island’s fleet out of the water for 48 hours, but Max and his father Blair Perkins want to squeeze one last day out of the season.

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