The Local Food Report

    

with Elspeth Hay and Ali Berlow

The Local Food Report can be heard every Thursday morning at 8:45am and afternoon at 5:45pm, and Saturday morning at 9:35.

An avid locavore, Elspeth Hay lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food, Diary of a Locavore. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it.

Ali Berlow lives on Martha's Vineyard and is the author of "The Food Activist Handbook; Big & Small Things You Can Do to Help Provide Fresh, Healthy Food for Your Community." Foreword by Alice Randall, Storey Publishing. You can reach her at her website, aliberlow.com.

The Local Food Report is produced by Jay Allison and Viki Merrick of Atlantic Public Media.

The Local Food Report is made possible by the support of the Local Food Chain.

Ali Berlow

Allen Healy and his wife Caitlin Jones run Mermaid Farm and Dairy in Chilmark with their brood: two boys and a couple of border collies, who mostly keep the herds of sheep and cows in line - the pigs, too, if and when they get out - and any people who come by the farmstand for vegetables, grains, yogurt, lassis, raw milk, cheese and meat.

Cover photo courtesy Paul Greenberg

The United States controls more ocean than any country on earth. And yet more than 85 percent of the seafood we eat is imported. On top of that, we're exporting more than 3 billion pounds of seafood a year.

Molly Glasgow

In 2009, Eric Glasgow and his wife retired from city life and bought a defunct dairy farm on Martha’s Vineyard. Ever since, they’ve been learning how to make dairy farming as low waste and low impact as possible.

Ali Berlow

Households in America account for 27 million tons of food waste a year. That's at an annual cost between $1,500 - $2,500 for an average family of four. Another one million tons a year of organic waste, like food scraps, also ends up in landfills.

According to WCAI’s science editor, Heather Goldstone, food waste is the single largest component of our trash and a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. Like methane.

Elspeth Hay

Since 2012, Kathleen Bacon has been a member of the Wellfleet Community Garden.

“This end is my plot,” Bacon said, showing me the spot, “which I’ve had since the garden opened. This is all lettuce—probably ten or twelve varieties of lettuce. And this small bed here holds fourteen tomato plants.”

Elspeth Hay

Gleaning is an ancient practice, as old as the Torah. It means to gather leftover grain or other produce from farm fields after a harvest, and traditionally was a form of charity. In most places, the tradition has died out. But today on Martha's Vineyard thanks to a program called Island Grown Gleaning, it's alive and well.

Sophie Abrams

Nationwide, household food waste accounts for 27 million tons a year, and businesses like restaurants and grocers add another 25 million tons.

And another one million tons of food waste comes from manufacturing plants, like from a soup company, for example – the peelings and trimmings or a batch gone wrong – all that also gets thrown into the landfills.

Elspeth Hay

One day Elspeth Hay brought home a Meyer lemon tree to keep outside in the summer and in front of a sunny window all winter. After a few years it's bearing fruit. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth talks with Kim Shkapich of Lola's Local Food Lab in Wellfleet about her recipe for lemon curd and the science behind it.

Photograph by Jocelyn Filley, courtesy of Edible Vineyard

After Rick Karney makes a public appearance, or gives a talk, the audience lingers. People wait around wanting to speak with him. They’ll even follow him out of the building. I’ve seen it happen over and over again. He doesn’t get the nickname “The Elvis of Shellfish” for nothing.

Ali Berlow

On the Local Food Report we’ve been thinking a lot about the why: why we make this show every week. Since we started in 2008 we’ve learned a lot about our local harvest, activism, and traditions. But we wanted to remind listeners why we’re interested in covering local food in the first place. So we asked co-hosts Elspeth Hay and Ali Berlow to give us their motivations.

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