The Local Food Report

    

with Elspeth Hay and Ali Berlow

The Local Food Report can be heard every Thursday morning at 8:45am and afternoon at 5:45pm, and Saturday morning at 9:35.

An avid locavore, Elspeth Hay lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food, Diary of a Locavore. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it.

Ali Berlow lives on Martha's Vineyard and is the author of "The Food Activist Handbook; Big & Small Things You Can Do to Help Provide Fresh, Healthy Food for Your Community." Foreword by Alice Randall, Storey Publishing. You can reach her at her website, aliberlow.com.

The Local Food Report is produced by Jay Allison and Viki Merrick of Atlantic Public Media.

The Local Food Report is made possible by the support of the Local Food Chain.

Photo by Elspeth Hay

Shishitos are suddenly showing up at markets and restaurants and dinner parties all over Cape Cod and the country. According to DMA solutions—a marketing firm for produce companies that actually studies these things—from 2010 to 2014, the popularity of shishito peppers on restaurant menus grew over 400 percent, putting the peppers just behind kale as the nation’s trendiest produce. 

Elspeth Hay

Paul Robeson was a legendary African American singer, actor, linguist, civil rights activist, and athlete. The tomato named in his honor is just as accomplished. Named number one for taste in the Carmel, California Tomato Fest, the Paul Robeson tomato is said to have a perfect balance of acid and sweet. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay learns about the heirloom variety from Wellfleet gardener Tracy Plaut. 

Here's a link to ideas for what to do with homegrown tomatoes.

Ali Berlow

Mariah Daggett has said more than once, “A cast iron skillet needs a good seasoning before it can really fly.” When Mariah talks about cooking and skillets, people listen. She’s the reigning champion of the iron Skillet Throw at the Martha’s Vineyard Agricultural Fair. “The key,” she says is a “hot-hot oven.”

All About Beets

Jul 28, 2016
Elspeth Hay

Beets are just coming into season. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay talks with Abby Miner and Caleb Lemieux of Crooked Farm in Orleans about beet varieties, beet recipes, and a little known fact about beet seeds. 

You can find a recipe for a beet pizza sauce, or as we're calling it "beet-za" sauce, on Elspeth's blog about food, Diary of a Locavore

This LFR is a rebroadcast. It aired originally August 1, 2013.

Elspeth Hay

My mother is a profound believer in the power of zucchini. A zucchini patch, she says, is a meal. It can feed a family for breakfast, for lunch, for dinner on the grill. You name the zucchini recipe, she's made it. She has four recipes for zucchini bread alone.

Pokeweed, a native wild perennial grows tenaciously in the Northeast and all across America. Some say parts of the plant have medicinal qualities, others say it can be poisonous to humans. But all do agree that the leaves and stems of poke once cooked are delicious. Dr. Paul Wheeler of Woods Hole shares his passion for pokeweed - how and why to cook it, instead of eradicate it.

 

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You’ve probably heard of a huckleberry. But have you ever eaten one? The small, black relatives of the blueberry grow all over the Cape and Islands, and Neil Gadway has been picking them his whole life.

The Good of Pig Slop

Jun 23, 2016
Photo by Ali Berlow

 

    

Zachariah Jones has been doing the slop rounds since he was just a sprout of a boy, barely big enough to hold down the pig buckets in the back of his father’s red truck.

Elspeth Hay

When it comes to fish, most New Englanders keep the fillets and toss the rest. But that's not the case in every culture. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth Hay talks with a Jamaican cook in Wellfleet about a traditional stew made with local bluefish heads. 

Photo by Elspeth Hay

  

Strawberry season, in my family, is a religious thing. We pick strawberries in late June every year, all together, no matter what. 

 

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