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Tyson Foods, the country's biggest poultry producer, is promising to stop feeding its chickens any antibiotics that are used in human medicine.

It's the most dramatic sign so far of a major shift by the poultry industry. The speed with which chicken producers have turn away from antibiotics, in fact, has surprised some of the industry's long-time critics.

For decades, the farmers that raise chickens, pigs, and cattle have used antibiotics as part of a formula for growing more animals, and growing them more cheaply.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2015 Maine Public Broadcasting Network. To see more, visit http://news.mpbn.net.

On April 27, 1865, the steamboat Sultana exploded and sank while traveling up the Mississippi River, killing an estimated 1,800 people.

The event remains the worst maritime disaster in U.S. history (the sinking of the Titanic killed 1,512 people). Yet few know the story of the Sultana's demise, or the ensuing rescue effort that included Confederate soldiers saving Union soldiers they might have shot just weeks earlier.

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