The Two-Way
4:35 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Authorities: Fort Hood's Shooter's Mental Health Not 'Precipitating Factor'

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 5:55 pm

The mental health of the alleged Fort Hood shooter was "not the direct precipitating factor," Lt. Gen. Mark Milley said during a televised press conference on Friday.

An "escalating argument in his unit" may have led Spc. Iván López, who was being treated for depression and evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder, to allegedly open fire, killing three soldiers and injuring more than a dozen.

"There was no premeditated targeting of individuals," Milley said.

During the press conference, we also learned:

-- Chris Grey, of the Army's Criminal Investigation Command, said it appears López "acted alone." He bought his semi-automatic pistol on March 1 and brought it onto the Army post against regulations.

-- So far, the investigators have not uncovered any criminal convictions. Milley added they also haven't been able to find any instances where López faced any "specific traumatic event," like suffering a wound or coming in contact with an enemy.

-- Both Milley and Grey refused to provide any particulars about the argument.

-- The names of the three men killed: Army Sgt. Timothy Owens, 37; Sgt. 1st Class Danny Ferguson, 39; Sgt. Carlos Lazaney Rodriguez, 38.

-- According to CNN: Owens was a "counselor in the Army and had served in Iraq." Ferguson had just returned from Afghanistan, and he was an "outstanding" high school athlete. Lazaney was from "Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, and planned to retire from the military soon, after serving 20 years."

Right before the press conference, López's family released a statement, saying they were troubled and surprised by his alleged actions.

López's father, Iván López Sr., said the situation had caused him great pain. López, he said, was a good son, a good worker, who always sought "good for his home and his family."

"My son was not like that," López Sr. said. "He must've not been in a right state of mind."

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