Kathryn Eident

co-Host Morning Edition, Reporter

Kathryn Eident is co-host for Morning Edition with Brian Morris. She first began producing stories for WCAI in 2008 as a Boston University graduate student reporting from the Statehouse. Since then, Kathryn’s work has appeared in the Boston Globe, Cape Cod Times, Studio 360, Scientific American, and Cape and Plymouth Business Magazine.

She also worked in commercial radio, first as a reporter, then news director, at Cape Cod Broadcasting, four commercial radio stations in Hyannis. In between, Kathryn spent several years sailing as a deckhand and mess attendant on Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution research ships, and has written for the Institution’s magazine, Oceanus.

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Transportation officials announced this week they had located the data recorder on the cargo ship, El Faro, which sank in some 15-thousand feet of water off the coast of the Bahamas.

Investigators found the recorder using technology built and operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Kathryn Eident talked with James Kinsey, an associate scientist at the Institution about the kinds of technology they used.

3bays.org

Visitors to the town dock at Cotuit Bay this spring will notice a new feature between the parking lot and the water.

It's a garden specially-designed to filter metal, tire rubber, hydrocarbons and other pollutants from storm-water runoff. 

Courtesy photo

A group of South Coast teens is in St. Louis this morning, prepping their home-made robot to compete in the Super Bowl of high school robotics--the FIRST Robotics Championship.

It's an overnight success story; the group of 14 kids from six high schools formed last fall and are competing this week against teams that have been around for decades.

Kathryn Eident talked with the group's mentor, UMass Dartmouth professor, Alex Fowler, to learn more.

Dan Tritle

The Friday News Roundup: Kathryn Eident leads a discussion of area print reporters of stories that made news this week.   Kathryn's guests are: Patrick Cassidy from the Cape Cod Times; Sam Houghton of the Mashpee Enterprise; Nelson Sigelman of the Martha's Vineyard Times; Ryan Bray of the Falmouth Enterprise; Jim DeArruda of the New Bedford Standard-Times; Ann Wood of the Provincetown Banner; and Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette.

File photo, wikicommons

Imagine looking through a telescope and discovering some of the brightest galaxies ever seen in the universe--galaxies so old, and so bright, scientists didn't believe they could even exist.

Now imagine being an undergraduate student at UMass Amherst and making that discovery.

Barnstable native and UMass Amherst senior Kevin Harrington was that person. He found these 10 billion-year-old galaxies crunching data from some of the world's most powerful telescopes during summer internships.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident speaks with Harrington to learn more.

Town Meeting season is once again upon us here on the Cape and Islands. In Provincetown, residents will consider several articles at next week's Town Meeting that address the town's affordable housing crunch.

One is a bylaw that would impose a fee on new development. The fee would go into an affordable housing fund. It's called the Inclusionary Housing Bylaw, and other places, like Boston and Barnstable, have similar versions in place.

Another article aims to slow conversions of older housing stock into condos, which often become unaffordable for year-round renters.

mass.gov

A new, solar-powered, electronic fish monitor at the Herring River in Harwich is at work counting the fish for which the river is named as they make their annual spring migration to the region. The newly-installed counter is the only one on the Cape, and one of four statewide.

Kathryn Eident talked with Brad Chase, of the state's division of Marine Fisheries, to learn more about why the counter is important to preserving this endangered species.
 

Alecia Orsini, WCAI-FM

Residents along the Cape, Coast and Islands woke up to a slushy mix of rain and sleet this morning, as a winter storm grazed the region on the first full day of Spring.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Hayden Frank said the region was spared the bulk of the snow, whereas areas north and west of the Cape Cod Canal saw as many as five to eight inches.

"It's really quick—once you come off the Cape Cod Canal, you lose that warmer air coming in off the ocean and snow amounts will increase," he said this morning around 5:30 a.m. 

projectfirstlight.com

Kathryn Eident, sitting in for Sean Corcoran, hosts a discussion with area journalists about the top local news stories of the week.

Sean Corcoran

When you hear "Lyme disease" you most likely think of ticks. But the source of the disease is actually a bacterium that lives inside the tick; the tick picks up the bacterium when it feeds on infected mammals like white-footed mice.

Scientists at the Mayo Clinic recently discovered another bacterium that causes Lyme. Kathryn Eident spoke with UMass Amherst microbiologist Stephen Rich about the discovery.

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