Kathryn Eident

co-Host Morning Edition, Reporter

Kathryn Eident is co-host for Morning Edition with Brian Morris. She first began producing stories for WCAI in 2008 as a Boston University graduate student reporting from the Statehouse. Since then, Kathryn’s work has appeared in the Boston Globe, Cape Cod Times, Studio 360, Scientific American, and Cape and Plymouth Business Magazine.

She also worked in commercial radio, first as a reporter, then news director, at Cape Cod Broadcasting, four commercial radio stations in Hyannis. In between, Kathryn spent several years sailing as a deckhand and mess attendant on Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution research ships, and has written for the Institution’s magazine, Oceanus.

Ways to Connect

Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority

The Cape Cod Regional Transit Authority announced new initiatives with local Councils on Aging this month to help senior citizens get around the region.

CCRTA Administrator Tom Cahir says the new programs were inspired in part because Barnstable's senior population will grow to more than 40 percent of the county by 2030. Kathryn Eident talked with Cahir to learn more about what his agency is doing about to help the Cape's senior citizens.

Scott Bauer, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Ticks are on the rise throughout New England, raising the prospect of an increase in Lyme disease and other illnesses associated with tick bites.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports about 30,000 cases of Lyme disease nationwide each year, but some officials say that due to underreporting, the number of actual cases could be much higher.

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The 2018  ballot will ask Massachusetts voters to raise the tax on the state's wealthiest residents to fund education initiatives and transportation projects.

WCAI’s State House reporter Mike Deehan joins Morning Edition co-host Kathryn Eident to talk about the so-called “millionaire's tax" and other happenings on Beacon Hill. 

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Each week, Kathryn Eident checks in with WCAI State House reporter, Mike Deehan, to hear what's happening on Beacon Hill. This week, Mike talks about a series of bills banning everything from using a cell phone while driving, to selling helium balloons.

Wikpedia

An advisory panel for the Cape Cod National Seashore can resume its regular meetings, after a month-long suspension. Federal interior officials told the Commission to halt its scheduled meeting last month, saying they wanted to review the panel's purpose as part of the Trump Administration transition. Last week, Seashore officials got word they may hold their next scheduled meeting in September.

cctrails.org

The state Department of Agricultural Resources approved plans by the utility, Eversource, last week to spray herbicides along power lines in more than a dozen Cape and Vineyard towns.

Local officials and residents have long opposed the idea, saying the chemicals could contaminate the water supply. Truro State Senator Julian Cyr filed two bills on Beacon Hill to give towns more say in the state approval process. Kathryn Eident talked with Cyr to learn more about the pending legislation.

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Democrats gather in Worcester Saturday for their annual state party convention.  Kathryn Eident talks with WCAI State House reporter Mike Deehan about that, and other political happenings on Beacon Hill. 

Kathryn Eident / WCAI-FM

Outdoor enthusiasts need to be especially vigilant about ticks in the spring and summer—that's when the arachnids are in their nymph stage and certain species can transmit diseases such as Lyme and Babesiosis.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident went to Dennis Pond in Yarmouth with county entomologist Larry Dapsis to talk more about the tick life cycle and ways to prevent tick bites from deer and lone star ticks.

  

Kathryn Eident / WCAI-FM

Trees are in full bloom across the region.  But if you take a closer look—especially at oak trees—you'll see little holes eaten through many of the leaves.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with county entomologist Larry Dapsis about the return of the gypsy moth and how bad the defoliation might be this year.  

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The end of Spring means a busy time on Beacon Hill, as lawmakers begin to finalize the state budget and bring some bills to the floor for votes.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan to go over some of the happenings in the capital. 

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