Elspeth Hay

An avid locavore, Elspeth lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her Local Food Report airs Thursdays at 8:30 on Morning Edition and 5:45pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30.

Mr.TinDC goo.gl/8ZmNS1 / goo.gl/cefU8

“Pawpaw is a tree that will grow here, and was growing here, actually, before the Europeans came,” Eliza Travesino said, as we stood in her Brewster backyard nursery, which holds about a thousand tiny trees. “It can grow from about 12-to-25 feet. It needs a few individuals to pollinate, it’s not self pollinating. And it also produces fruit”

keepps goo.gl/TBgpu6 / goo.gl/lrxVf4

Elspeth Hay: Almost every week, late Friday or early Saturday, my house runs out of milk. We belong to a milk co-op; each Sunday a different local family takes turns driving to Dartmouth and bringing back milk for every family in the group. The amount we get is the closest to what we need, but it doesn't always last us until the following Sunday. 

Stijn Nieuwendijk bit.ly/2nZhq1v / bit.ly/OJZNiI

It’s seed ordering time again. While the cold blows in under the doors and through cracks in the windows, the catalogs pour in through the mail. And it’s time to start thinking about this year’s gardens. What are we going to plant? Well, together with his wife, Peter Staaterman runs Longnook Meadows Farm in Truro, and he has an idea.

David Constance

Ryan Mann is the Outreach and Stewardship Coordinator for the Harwich Conservation Trust. This time of year, he spends most days at a dam where the head of the Herring River meets Hinckley Pond.

“Herring are migratory fish,” Mann tells me. “They’re called anadromous fish—meaning that they live most of their lives in sea, and then they come up once a year to spawn.”

wayne marshall / flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Every winter around this time, Andrea Thorrold stocks her pantry. But she doesn’t do it at the store. Instead, she drives three hours to Western Massachusetts to pick up approximately 100 pounds of grains and beans to see her family through the year.

Elspeth Hay

Jayde Dilks grew up in a small, seaside town in Northeastern England. In 2006 she came to Wellfleet for an internship, fell in love with the area and the man who is now her fiancé, and decided to stay. Today she spends her nights managing a Provincetown restaurant and her mornings in her growing garden. Recently we sat down in my kitchen to talk about her seed order for this year.

Cover photo courtesy Paul Greenberg

The United States controls more ocean than any country on earth. And yet more than 85 percent of the seafood we eat is imported. On top of that, we're exporting more than 3 billion pounds of seafood a year.

Molly Glasgow

In 2009, Eric Glasgow and his wife retired from city life and bought a defunct dairy farm on Martha’s Vineyard. Ever since, they’ve been learning how to make dairy farming as low waste and low impact as possible.

Elspeth Hay

Since 2012, Kathleen Bacon has been a member of the Wellfleet Community Garden.

“This end is my plot,” Bacon said, showing me the spot, “which I’ve had since the garden opened. This is all lettuce—probably ten or twelve varieties of lettuce. And this small bed here holds fourteen tomato plants.”

Elspeth Hay

Gleaning is an ancient practice, as old as the Torah. It means to gather leftover grain or other produce from farm fields after a harvest, and traditionally was a form of charity. In most places, the tradition has died out. But today on Martha's Vineyard thanks to a program called Island Grown Gleaning, it's alive and well.

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