Elspeth Hay

An avid locavore, Elspeth lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it. Her Local Food Report airs Thursdays at 8:30 on Morning Edition and 5:45pm on All Things Considered, as well as Saturday mornings at 9:30.

wayne marshall / flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Every winter around this time, Andrea Thorrold stocks her pantry. But she doesn’t do it at the store. Instead, she drives three hours to Western Massachusetts to pick up approximately 100 pounds of grains and beans to see her family through the year.

Elspeth Hay

Jayde Dilks grew up in a small, seaside town in Northeastern England. In 2006 she came to Wellfleet for an internship, fell in love with the area and the man who is now her fiancé, and decided to stay. Today she spends her nights managing a Provincetown restaurant and her mornings in her growing garden. Recently we sat down in my kitchen to talk about her seed order for this year.

Cover photo courtesy Paul Greenberg

The United States controls more ocean than any country on earth. And yet more than 85 percent of the seafood we eat is imported. On top of that, we're exporting more than 3 billion pounds of seafood a year.

Molly Glasgow

In 2009, Eric Glasgow and his wife retired from city life and bought a defunct dairy farm on Martha’s Vineyard. Ever since, they’ve been learning how to make dairy farming as low waste and low impact as possible.

Elspeth Hay

Since 2012, Kathleen Bacon has been a member of the Wellfleet Community Garden.

“This end is my plot,” Bacon said, showing me the spot, “which I’ve had since the garden opened. This is all lettuce—probably ten or twelve varieties of lettuce. And this small bed here holds fourteen tomato plants.”

Elspeth Hay

Gleaning is an ancient practice, as old as the Torah. It means to gather leftover grain or other produce from farm fields after a harvest, and traditionally was a form of charity. In most places, the tradition has died out. But today on Martha's Vineyard thanks to a program called Island Grown Gleaning, it's alive and well.

Elspeth Hay

One day Elspeth Hay brought home a Meyer lemon tree to keep outside in the summer and in front of a sunny window all winter. After a few years it's bearing fruit. This week on the Local Food Report, Elspeth talks with Kim Shkapich of Lola's Local Food Lab in Wellfleet about her recipe for lemon curd and the science behind it.

Ali Berlow

On the Local Food Report we’ve been thinking a lot about the why: why we make this show every week. Since we started in 2008 we’ve learned a lot about our local harvest, activism, and traditions. But we wanted to remind listeners why we’re interested in covering local food in the first place. So we asked co-hosts Elspeth Hay and Ali Berlow to give us their motivations.

Elspeth Hay

My father’s goal for the past decade or so has been to cook his way through the book “660 Curries.”

“I don’t think I’m past about 60 recipes,” he says. “So I have 600 to go. But I’m getting there.”

Mac Hay/Mac's Seafood

Have you ever had whiting? It’s a small fish, usually about 12-to-14 inches long, with a soft white flesh and a mild flavor. It lives in our waters, and historically, the whiting fishery was big on Cape Cod every fall. These days, though, most local fisherman aren’t catching whiting, and it’s hard to find in local markets.

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