Elsa Partan

Producer for Living Lab

Elsa Partan is a producer for Living Lab Radio. She first came to the station in 2002 as an intern and fell in love with radio. She is a graduate of Bryn Mawr College and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. From 2006 to 2009, she covered the state of Wyoming for the NPR member station Wyoming Public Media in Laramie. She was a newspaper reporter at The Mashpee Enterprise from 2010 to 2013. She lives in Falmouth with her husband and two daughters.
 

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A tulip placed on a melting piece of iceberg brought from Greenland to Paris as part of an art installation called Ice Watch.
Heather Goldstone / WCAI

At noon on December 12th - 12 o'clock on 12/12 - the bells of Notre Dame were tolling non-stop, as the electronic notification went out that international climate negotiators had released a final agreement. The two things were completely unrelated, but it was a memorable moment, nonetheless.

Republic of Kiribati

Sea level rise and increasingly extreme weather are among the most visible impacts of climate change. Coastal communities around the Cape and Islands are facing skyrocketing insurance rates, and damage to homes and infrastructure. But for the residents of small island nations, climate change poses an existential threat. 

Candle smoke transitions from straight, laminar flow to confused, turbulent flow. How and why aren't well understood. Nigel Goldenfeld sees parallels between such physical processes and the evolution of life.
Gary Settles / Wikimedia Commons

Nigel Goldenfeld sees patterns everywhere in the natural world. The physicist from the University of Illinois is a member of its top-ranked Condensed Matter Theory group, and studies how patterns evolve in time, “be they snowflakes, the microstructures of materials, the turbulent flow of fluids, geological formations, or even the spatial organization of microbes.”

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As the Navy continues to search for the doomed cargo ship El Faro, the loss has an eerie resemblance to the Derbyshire disaster some three decades before. 

Today is the 50th birthday of the submarine Alvin. But there’s no time for cake.  Alvin is a working sub…and it’s in the Gulf of Mexico right now. This week researchers are using Alvin to study organisms that live near oil seeps in the Gulf.

Ten years ago, not one state in the nation allowed same-sex couples to marry. Now 18 states do, including Arkansas, which joined that group yesterday.

Massachusetts was the first. And tomorrow marks ten years since gay and lesbian couples were allowed to tie the knot.

WCAI’s Elsa Partan has the story of one Cape Cod couple who sued the state and won the right to marry.

Since then, they’ve watched as bans on gay marriage around the country have fallen and failed.

Wikipedia

The cargo ship captain who survived his ship’s takeover by Somali pirates in 2009 will be presenting awards to local heroes on Cape Cod. 

Captain Richard Phillips wrote a book about the experience of being taken hostage by pirates called A Captain's Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy SEALs, and Dangerous Days at Sea.  It was turned into a movie starring Tom Hanks, called Captain Phillips. Despite all the attention, he says he’s not a hero.

Remembering J.F.K.

Nov 21, 2013
Alecia Orsini

JFK's assassination is still a clear memory for many Americans, including residents of Cape Cod. In collaboration with the Cape Cod Times, WCAI producer Elsa Partan recorded the memories of Cape Cod residents of that day. The voices are of the following people: Dean Troxell of Centerville, Lucy Tanneyhill Cromwell of Mashpee, Christine Collins Crane of Bourne, Daniel Farren Jr. of Forestdale, and Michael Robbins of East Sandwich.

slack12 / flickr

The U.S. Coast Guard has determined that the light keeper’s house that sits next to the much-photographed Nobska Lighthouse in Woods Hole is, “excess to the mission of the Coast Guard,” according to a spokesman.

That determination clears the way for the government to lease the nearly 140-year-old house to another organization, or to sell it.

Spokesman Joe Klinker says the Coast Guard will always keep possession of the light, which remains an aid to navigation.

Tom Kleindinst, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Executive Vice President and Director of Research Larry Madin at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution speaks with WCAI's Elsa Partan about the impacts of the partial federal shutdown on the Oceanographic.

Those affects include being cut off from communications with federal grant managers, not being able to bill federal agencies for work that WHOI has done, and having work delayed because federal agencies are not able to do their part of joint projects.

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