News

Sounds From the Past

Jun 5, 2018
Harp Gallery / https://bit.ly/2JicmPm

I have a long and somewhat odd history with old phonographs and records.  During my early years on the Cape I once salvaged several old Enrico Caruso records - 12” in diameter and only recorded on one side – from an abandoned dune shack.  Over the years I also bought several dozen more old records from Ben Thatcher’s Sound Museum in East Dennis. I kept them all, though it was years before I had anything to play them on. 

Pien Huang / WCAI

 

 

Nantucket is gearing up for the summer season, when it becomes a prime vacation destination. But for a portion of the island’s year-round population, it's when finding housing becomes a squeeze.

 

 

 

Fish croquettes that were grown in a lab, not in a fish. Likely the most expensive fish dish ever consumed.
Finless Foods

Soon, you may be able to eat hamburger that was grown in a Petri dish rather than on a cow.

In his book, Clean Meat: How Growing Meat Without Animals Will Revolutionize Dinner and the World, author Paul Shapiro details how start ups like Memphis Meats and Finless Foods are growing animal cells in the lab that are safe to eat.

Rabbit Rabbit Radio

Three Cape Cod-based composers will mark World Oceans Day (Friday, June 8) by releasing a new album of original music developed in collaboration with ocean scientists. It’s called Black Inscription, and two of the composers – the husband and wife team Carla Kihlstedt and Matthias Bossi – spoke with Living Lab Radio about it. 

Residents of Cape Cod are no strangers to chemical contaminants in their drinking water. The military base here has been a Superfund site since 1989 due to jet fuel and other contaminants in the groundwater. But a new class of chemicals came onto the scene a few years ago, not only on Cape Cod, but around the country. They’re known as PFASs and they come from things like firefighting foam, flame retardants, and non-stick coatings.

A group of seals living off the coast of West Antarctica has provided scientists with data that could help to improve estimates of future sea-level rise.
NOAA / http://bit.ly/2LU6Tjs

Each month, we speak to our colleagues at the Journal Nature to hear about the stories they are following. This month we talk with Nature's Anna Nagle.

Boston Globe

Whether you live on Cape Cod year-round or visit during summer, Route 6 is a part of daily life. Most of us use it to get pretty much anywhere of any distance on this small peninsula. It’s so baked into the DNA of the place that it’s hard to imagine a time before summer traffic jams, before the familiar artery we so heavily rely on today.

Poetry Sunday: Emily A. Brightman

Jun 3, 2018
J. Donaldson

Emily reads her poem, " Where I'm From."

SJunker

WCAI News Director Steve Junker hosts a roundup of some of the top local and regional news of the week. This week's guests include: Cindy McCormick of the Cape Cod Times, Brittany Feldott of the Falmouth Enterprise, Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette, Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle, Ed Miller of the Provincetown Banner, George Brennan of the Martha's Vineyard Times, and Andy Tomolonis of SouthCoast Today.

Steve Junker

Black sea bass season opened on May 19th, and there have been reports of very good fishing. If you don’t know a sea bass from a striped bass, don’t worry—here’s what you need to know.

Courtesy of the Cape Cod Cooperative Extension

We're now deep within the active period for ticks on the Cape, Coast and Islands, and many of them harbor illnesses that can make humans sick--including Lyme, Babesiosis, Anaplasmosis and other diseases with sobering names. 

WCAI Morning Edition Host Kathryn Eident talked with Cape Cod Cooperative Extension Entomologist Larry Dapsis about this year's tick population, and how to protect ourselves.

georgefoy.com

In October of 2015 the El Faro, a U.S. flagged cargo ship, sank in Hurricane Joaquin northeast of the Bahamas.  Despite a seasoned crew, state of the art navigation systems, and advance warning of the storm, the ship went down with without sending out a Mayday and without launching lifeboats.

Elspeth Hay

A small crowd of people at the Plimoth Grist Mill recite excitedly in unison, “One, two three: Water on!” One of the millers and a group of visitors are starting the water wheel at the same site where the Pilgrims built the first American grist mill in 1636. The replica mill, operated by Plimouth Plantation, works not only as an exhibit but also as a modern-day production facility. Kim Van Wormer and Matt Tavares are the millers. 

Photo Courtesy Bob Maffei

Since the Trump administration began instating a cap on H-2B visas, the visas often used by businesses to hire seasonal foreign workers, many companies on the Cape have struggled to find summer employees. Though a recent raise in the cap is expected to add an additional 15,000 H2B workers nationally, some are looking towards Puerto Rico as a way to fill vacancies. 

Summer Reading

May 30, 2018
J. Junker

A number of studies show that students who don’t read during their summer break see their reading abilities stagnate or decline! Jill Erickson, reference librarian at Falmouth Public Library, and Mary Fran Buckley from Eight Cousins bookstore in Falmouth,  join us on The Point with thoughts on summer reading and suggestions for all ages.

 

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