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Residents in several Lower Cape towns will consider upcoming Town Meeting articles similar to the "sanctuary city" declarations in Boston and Somerville. Those declarations discourage local officials and police from enforcing federal immigration laws without a judge’s order.

As WCAI’s Kathryn Eident reports, some Cape residents think the declaration of a so-called "safe community" is vital to protecting immigrants’ rights, while others say the idea has raised more questions than answers.

From little white lies to pathological habits, we explore the tricky realms of deception, and the power of truth. Psychologist Michael Abbruzzese and psychiatrist Marc Whaley join host Mindy Todd in The Point studio. 

And here's a link to a quiz asking you how much you really know about lies.

Mark Faherty

In last week’s report I griped about our typically cold and wet spring weather here on the Cape and Islands. I submit that it was a direct result of this griping that we then enjoyed nearly a week of atypically warm, sunny early spring weather. You’re welcome.

Albert Kok - ma photo, CC BY-SA 3.0, / goo.gl/mLWAcJ

There's a textbook version of evolution that goes something like this: random changes to an individual's DNA are inherited by its offspring. The worst changes are weeded out by natural selection, and the process goes on. Unless you're an octopus or a squid.

New research suggests that cephalopods do something different. They change their RNA. A lot. And that may help explain why they, alone amongst all invertebrates, are so intelligent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey_seal

For conservation biologists, the growing number of gray seals in New England is a success story. For some fishermen and beachgoers, it's another story altogether. Seals can steal fish, damage fishing gear, block beach access, and attract great white sharks. For all these reasons, seals have become a touchy subject in communities across the Cape and Islands - nowhere more so than on Nantucket.

What Spring Asks of Us

Apr 18, 2017
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Walking the tidal flats on a cool spring afternoon, Robert Finch is struck by a fundamental divide between humans and the natural world: for animals and plants, spring is a moment of propulsion, with a clear call forward to migration and renewal. What, he wonders, does spring ask of us?

Homeschooling

Apr 18, 2017

It’s becoming more common for families to homeschool their children. What are some of the reasons why? What are the legal rights and obligations of homeschooling families and what can local schools require of homeschoolers?  We’ll talk with the director of the Massachusetts Home Learning Association and hear from students and parents who have embarked on the homeschooling journey.  

Nantucket Cottage Hospital

The 121st Boston Marathon was a success, but a Nantucket doctor who has run nearly 50 races sat this one out because of an injury.

Kathryn Eident talked with Dr. Tim Lepore about his life as a runner and whether he'll be lacing up his running shoes again. 

Meredith Nierman

More than 20 million Americans run regularly. Half of them get injured. Adam Tenforde, M.D., joins Living Lab Radio to talk tips for healthy running at any age.

Chester Harding

During the golden age of whaling in the 19th century, more that 170,000 people signed on for whaling voyages aboard hundreds of vessels. What’s not as well-known is that more than 60 whaling captains were black.

Martha’s Vineyard resident Skip Finley is writing a book that explores the history of black whaling captains.

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