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The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

ISIS 'Beyond Anything We've Seen,' Hagel Says

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, left, with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey during a Pentagon briefing on Thursday. Hagel said Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria posed a threat "beyond anything we've seen."
Yuri Gripas Reuters/Landov

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel describes a failed U.S. mission into northern Syria earlier this summer to rescue Americans believed held there — including a journalist who was executed earlier this week — as "flawless" despite not recovering the hostages.

"This was a flawless operation, but the hostages weren't there," Hagel told journalists at a Pentagon briefing with Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

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The Salt
4:30 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Can Quinoa Take Root On The 'Roof Of The World'?

Grown for thousands of years in South America, quinoa crossed the Atlantic for the first time in the 21st century, according to the United Nations.
iStockphoto.com

For thousands of years, quinoa barely budged from its home in the Andes. Other crops — corn, potatoes, rice, wheat and sorghum — traveled and colonized the world. But quinoa stayed home.

All of a sudden, quinoa is a trendy, jet-setting "superfood." And as we've reported, some American farmers are trying to cash in on its new-found popularity.

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Shots - Health News
4:27 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Vision Problems Increase The Risk Of Death In Older People

Seeing better can mean living longer because it helps people remain independent.
iStockphoto

An eye exam may be the ticket to a longer life, researchers say, because good vision is essential for being able to shop, manage money and live independently. And maintaining independence in turn leads to a longer life.

Researchers have known for years that people who have vision problems as they get older are more likely to die than those who still see well. But they weren't sure why that was so.

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Parallels
4:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

European Fighters Take On More Prominent Roles In The Islamic State

The masked man seen executing American journalist James Foley in this video is believed to be from the U.K., based on his accent.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:39 pm

British authorities are trying to identify the masked man who executed American photojournalist James Foley in a video that has caused massive global reaction.

The man — who appears wearing all black, holding a knife, and wearing a gun holster — speaks in an accent that linguists say sounds like someone from East or South London. The video yields other clues to the man's identity, such as his height and the fact that he's left-handed.

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Law
4:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

McDonnell Takes The Stand, Founding Defense On Marital Dysfunction

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Economy
4:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

The Quandary At Jackson Hole: Is It Time To Step Back From Stimulus?

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Law
4:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Bank Of America Settles With Feds And States For Record Amount

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
4:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Failed Foley Rescue Reveals Challenges Faced By U.S. Intelligence

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Africa
4:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Why Ebola Is Making It Harder To Provide Good Health Care

Protective equipment is in short supply. Here, a Liberian burial team carefully disinfects their gloves before disposing of them.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:12 pm

The Ebola virus has killed more than 1,300 people in West Africa, but the indirect deaths caused by this epidemic are likely to be far worse. Right now, it's the rainy season. And that means it's high season for malaria.

"Probably 85 percent of the fevers right now are malaria," says Laura Miller, health coordinator in Sierra Leone for the International Rescue Committee.

"But more of those cases will go untreated than usual."

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Health
4:10 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

American Ebola Patients Leave Atlanta Hospital Healthy

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 5:12 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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