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One-hundred percent of votes are now in in New Hampshire and a couple things are now official:

1. Record for total turnout: Combing all voters — Democrats and Republicans — it was a record for a New Hampshire primary. In all, 538,094 people cast ballots. That beats the 2008 record of 527,349.

2. The Republican record was shattered: The final tally for GOP ballots cast was 284,120 votes. That beats out the 2012 Republican primary tally of 248,475.

Attention Harry Potter fans.

This is not a drill.

A new Harry Potter book will be published this summer.

The book, called Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts I & II picks up the story of Harry, Ron and Hermione where the epilogue left off, according to author J.K. Rowling's website Pottermore.

As you no doubt vividly remember, the series' final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, closes on a scene that takes place 19 years after the Battle of Hogwarts and Voldemort's downfall.

There's really only one thing you absolutely need to hold a big-wave surf competition, and it's big waves.

The U.S. Department of Justice is suing the city of Ferguson, Mo., for unjust policing that violates the civil and constitutional rights of citizens, Attorney General Loretta Lynch announced Wednesday.

The lawsuit came one day after the Ferguson City Council voted to change a proposed consent decree to reform the police and courts. The council said the package, which had been negotiated between the DOJ and city officials, cost too much.

Left: Rick Wilking/Reuters Right: Jim Bourg/Reuters 

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders each aspire to take the helm of the world's most powerful country.

But foreign policy isn't a strong suit for either candidate.  And neither seems to have assembled much of a foreign policy team. 

When Politico.com set out to determine who was advising Sanders on global affairs, editor Susan Glasser says she was "amazed" at the results. 

A few years ago, mysterious green bottles started washing up on the New England coast.

Each one contained a message from Ken Baker, a crane operator who lives in the Scituate, Mass. So far, Baker has thrown 223 of these bottles into the Atlantic Ocean.

The journey of Baker's bottles starts in his basement. They originally started in 2012 when his wife bought some bottles of San Pellegrino water.

"I used to clean 'em and wash 'em, and put 'em on my fence posts outside. I think my neighbors thought I was a raging alcoholic for a while," he says.

In Flint, Mich., government officials allowed water from the Flint River to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water. The damaged pipes continue to contaminate the water, and it could take months — or years — to repair and rebuild the water system.

It could take even longer to rebuild something more abstract: trust, between citizens and their government.

Roxanne Adair, a vendor at the local farmers market, says this goes deeper than just the water.

Humans have long turned to the dog for its nose, especially in its ability to hunt, track missing people, and search for drugs.

But there is a new challenge: Bomb-detecting dogs have to now learn to find the increasingly common Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) that can be assembled from ingredients that are not dangerous by itself.

"So we're now asking dogs not just to find a needle in a haystack – now the problem is more like saying to the dog 'we need you to find any sharp object in the haystack,' " says Clive Wynne, a professor at Arizona State University.

One Moore Bookstore, a small shopfront on a busy street in downtown Monrovia, represents many firsts. Though there are stores here that sell text books, this is the first selling books purely for reading pleasure. And its owners publish some of the only books aimed at Liberian children. The bookstore is a rare place where kids might hear a story read to them just for fun.

Aedes aegypti is the dog of the mosquito world. It acts as if it's man's best friend.

"It's been with us for a long time, probably for at least 5,000 years when we started keeping water next to our homes [ideal for laying eggs] and it's adapted to people," says Marten Edwards, an entomologist at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pa. "It loves us. It loves our cities. It loves our blood. It functions very well with us."

There's just one problem. This mosquito makes us sick.

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