Nevena Zubcevik is at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital
Texas Lutheran University http://bit.ly/2w3MQKH

Dr. Nevena Zubcevik is a brain injury researcher and co-director of the new Dean Center for Tick Borne Illness at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, which focuses on treating the long-term effects of Lyme disease. She is also an instructor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School, an attending physician at Spalding and Massachusetts General Hospital. We spoke to her in August 2016 about her work and we are replaying a shorter version of that program below.

Wouldn’t it be fascinating to go back 30,000 to 50,000 years and meet the humans and Neanderthals who walked the earth? So many mysteries would be answered about how they lived and what their societies were like. We can’t talk to them, but maybe we can hear some of their music.

Archeologists have been studying ancient bone flutes of humans from that era and making reconstructions that can played, at least in the right hands.

Poetry Sunday: J. Lorraine Brown

Aug 13, 2017

J. Lorraine Brown reads her poem "Why I Never Learned to Play the Piano."

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WCAI News Director Steve Junker hosts a roundup of some of the top local and regional news of the week. His guests include Chris Lindahl of the Cape Cod Times; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette; Josh Balling of the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror; Ed Miller of the Provincetown Banner; and George Brennan of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

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More than 60,000 patients in the U.S. receive general anesthesia every day. But despite the fact that anaesthesia drugs, like ether, have been around for more than 150 years, it's really only been in the past decade or so that we've gained a better understanding of how they work.

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The Legislature is on their August recess and Gov. Charlie Baker has been taking a little time off this week, but that didn't stop electoral politics from creating buzz on Beacon Hill. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan for an update. 

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Water temperatures south of the Cape are hitting 70-75 degrees. That's not great news for anglers looking for striped bass. But who cares? Because here comes the most exciting fishing action of the year: fast fish.

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There's music, food, science and revelry in the event calendar. Really, what more could you ask for? Here's your Weekend Outlook. 

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Invasive species are not new to the region. Here on the Cape, just look around at the trees and you'll see evidence of the gypsy moth, an invasive species from Europe that gorged on leaves earlier this summer.

Barnstable County entomologist Larry Dapsis is keeping an eye on that, and the latest pest that may have come to Cape Cod to stay: The brown marmorated stink bug. This insect is native to Asia and is known for damaging both vegetable and fruit crops in the U.S. 

The Teenage Brain

Aug 10, 2017

On The Point, an interview with Dr. Frances Jensen, who offers a new look at the brains of teenagers, dispelling myths, and offering practical advice for teens, parents and teachers. Her book is called The Teenage Brain- a Neuroscientist's Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults. Heather Goldstone hosts.

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photo by Lisa Jo Rudy