WCAI Series Reporting

WCAI brings you original in-depth reporting on issues facing the Cape, Islands, and South Coast: Wind Turbines, Education, Water Quality, Alzheimer's, and more.

Stories on this page have been tagged as "Series Reporting."

Click here for a list of all WCAI's series reporting.

Many of our series have won awards. A full list is on our Awards page.

Growing Old in Portuguese New Bedford

Sep 16, 2014
Sarah Reynolds

In a grey duplex on a narrow street in New Bedford, Margarida Xavier fixes a pillow on her living room couch and sits down. She’s 86 years old. She moved to New Bedford from the Azores in Portugal more than 50 years ago, but she still doesn’t speak much English. She’s lived alone since her husband died ten years ago. And it’s been lonely.

But every few weeks she gets a visitor – Lucy Oliveira, the Senior Services Coordinator with the Immigrants’ Assistance Center in New Bedford. Oliveira comes by once or twice a month to visit and to help Xavier read her mail. 

Nantucket, Microcosm of a Changing Region

Sep 15, 2014
Fr. Marcel Bouchard

Young immigrants have been crossing the border into the U.S. in record numbers over the past few years.  This summer, Governor Patrick offered Camp Edwards as a temporary place to house the youngest of them. People held rallies around the Cape in response – some opposing the plan and some showing support. The Governor’s plan may have struck a chord with Cape Codders since demographics are in flux here, too.

  Homeowners Feel Blindsided by Proposed Flood Insurance Rate Hikes

Photo by Sean Corcoran

Part 5 of our 5-part series "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments."

BOSTON -- One of the longest and most anticipated Alzheimer drug studies in history is about to begin, and Dr. Reisa Sperling is wondering if people will come. It's called the A4 study, and Sperling is the project leader.

"I sometimes get very worried," she said, "who will we find that wants to come into a 3-year trial on the chance that they might develop Alzheimer's disease dementia?

Photo by Sean Corcoran

Part 4 of our 5-part series "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments."    

Dr. Bill Klunk is a clinician and researcher at the University of Pittsburgh, and he spent much his career finding ways to see Alzheimer's in people's brains.  

Sometimes, he said, he likes to tell people about his dream last day on the job -- that final day before he retires. And in the dream, he meets with Mrs. Smith in the clinic and he says:

Photo by Sean Corcoran

Part 3 of our 5-part series "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments."    

As researchers work to find Alzheimer's treatments, they have a small, furry ally at their disposal -- the mouse.  And at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, they live in a lower level of the school, well below the series of labs upstairs where dozens of researchers are looking for ways to stop Alzheimer's disease.

J.J.

In a new five-part series, WCAI senior reporter and editor Sean Corcoran looks at some of the most recent innovations related to finding a cure or preventative for Alzheimer's disease. Sean traveled to labs in San Diego, Boston, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, and New York City.  On The Point he talks with Mindy Todd about reporting the series "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments." Dr.

Alzheimer's Researchers Learning from Past Mistakes

Oct 1, 2013
Photo by Sean Corcoran

Part 2 of our 5-part series "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments."    

At his lab at UC San Diego, Dr. Steve Wagner takes from the lower shelf a clear, plexiglass box filled with small bottles. He needs two hands to carefully lift it.

Sean Corcoran

Part One of our 5-part series "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments."  

Harvard-Mass General researcher Dr. Rob Moir has a hypothesis about a small protein, or peptide, that the body makes called amyloid-beta, or Abeta. This is the stuff that's known to clog the brains of Alzheimer's patients with the disease's telltale plaques. But Moir's hypothesis is that Abeta may actually be part of our immune system.

tigerweet / flickr

WCAI presents an original reporting series, "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments." In the 5-part series (links below), senior reporter and editor Sean Corcoran looks at some of the most recent innovations related to finding a cure or preventative for the disease, traveling to labs in San Diego, Boston, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, and New York City.


WCAI takes an in-depth look at the current state and future prospects of New England’s fisheries.

This 10-part original reporting series aired July 8th - 19, 2013. 

Here is a link to the page where we've gathered together all the radio and online reporting.

 

Ron Schloerb/Cape Cod Times

Without a general studies Bachelor Degree-granting institution on Cape Cod, local high school seniors are forced to seek higher education elsewhere. Part two in our original 3-part series "By The Numbers: Worries About Cape Cod's Workforce," examines efforts to bring a degree-granting 4-year college - with student housing - to the region. Proponents believe such an institution is key to growing the young-adult population.

Data from US Census

A group of young professionals are taking the lead to help find ways to keep their peers on Cape Cod. Part one in our original 3-part series "By The Numbers: Worries About Cape Cod's Workforce," examines reasons career-minded young people find it difficult to stay on the Cape, and explores some of the community initiatives to keep them here.

By The Numbers: Worries About Cape Cod's Workforce

Feb 26, 2013

The 2010 Census confirmed that the greying of Cape Cod is continuing. The youngest generations are leaving the Cape and they're not coming back. Some people are more alarmed about this trend than others. But people in leadership positions are thinking about what the loss in population and workforce could mean for the Cape in terms of both workforce and vitality. 

Tick Control

Aug 17, 2012

Ticks — and tick-borne diseases — have become a part of life on the Cape and Islands, and across the Northeast. To address the problem and fill a need, private companies are creating new products designed to help keep ticks off us so we can avoid their dangerous bites. At the same time, researchers are developing and testing innovative ways to reduce tick populations and take the fight directly to the tick.

Part 5 of 5

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