WCAI News

Hoping for Housing in a Sea of Million-Dollar Homes

Dec 20, 2016
Courtesy of Housing Assistance Corporation.

This spring 22 homes will go up for sale in a new development on Nantucket. Alicia Briscol, a postal worker on island, is hoping to buy one.

When Briscol  first moved to Nantucket in 2006, she realized two things. First: she loved this island off the coast of Massachusetts.

“I love the quiet and the quaintness,” she said, “the cobblestone street. I was just amazed by - this place is in the United States!”

And second: if you’re not a millionaire, it’s really hard to find a place to live.

Wikipedia Commons

A new board is forming in Provincetown that will oversee the state's first-ever rental housing trust for middle-income residents. 

The trust will help residents who make too much to qualify for low-income housing assistance, but can't afford to pay the median 700-thousand dollars for a house in town.

By Car, Truck and Boat: Handling an Island's Trash

Dec 9, 2016
Angela Scionti

Don Hatch is a numbers man. He has to know the costs of what it takes to recycle his trash, or else he’s losing money. Because of that, he has to be creative.  

"Two years ago we were receiving $25 a ton for recycling," he said. "This year we are paying $40 a ton. So the recycling market is pretty poor right now. So we are just mixing everything and sending it off to a plant in Woburn."

Edie Kennedy

The number of people riding bicycles is increasing. In Massachusetts, it’s more than doubled during the past decade. But as the popularity of cycling goes up, so do the number of accidents. In Provincetown, bicycle-related accidents have increased almost 25 percent in the last 5 years.

Olga Golub is one of the people who loves to bike in Provincetown with her husband.

“Commercial Street, we walk it of course a lot, but biking, it’s so much easier than bringing a car,” said Golub.

Brian Morris/WCAI

Cape Cod residents lined up at Town Halls across Cape Cod this week as early voting got underway in Massachusetts. WCAI Morning Edition hosts Brian Morris and Kathryn Eident have a report.

wellfleetspat.org

State fisheries officials have closed shellfish beds in Wellfleet after an outbreak of norovirus sickened about 75 people. The 16th annual OysterFest is this weekend, and it’s an event that draws upwards of 20,000 people.

Michele Insley of SPAT, the event’s organizing group, discusses what the closure means for OysterFest, with WCAI’s Morning Edition co-host Kathryn Eident.

Kathryn Eident

Despite last week’s rain, the region—and the state—is still in a drought. The dry conditions have local fire officials on heightened alert for the risk of wildfire. As WCAI’s Kathryn Eident reports, officials are staffing fire towers and taking other steps to help prevent dangerous brush fires.

Brian Morris/WCAI

A group of restored World War Two aircraft touched down at Barnstable Municipal Airport recently. They’re part of the “Wings of Freedom” annual tour, and they offer an up close look at some of the historic bombers and fighters that helped to liberate Europe during the 1940s, and that still stir vivid memories today.

Lydia Keating

On a steamy August day, at 5:30 in the morning, I joined a crew of fishermen on the Maria Mendosa—one of the few trap fishing boats in the world. It’s called trap fishing because you catch fish in a massive floating net trap. And when I say massive, I mean a floating net the size of a football field.

There’s no bait. Instead, the fish get caught as the fishermen pull up the net. The traps are placed roughly 1 mile off the coast here in Narragansett Bay, just waiting for fish to come by. Captain Corey Forest said that the traps are like giant floating aquariums.

Kathryn Eident

Next month, the Smithsonian will open the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. It’s an idea that has been years in the making—advocates first suggested a museum in the early 1900s.

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