WCAI News

Credit: Entergy Nuclear, pilgrimpower.com

A newly-formed nuclear decommissioning advisory panel will meet for the first time Wednesday with owners of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Plant in Plymouth. 

Legislation creating the panel was signed into law last summer by Governor Charlie Baker. Provincetown State Representative Sarah Peake helped push the bill through. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with her about her vision for what the panel can accomplish. 

The meeting is at Plymouth South High School Wednesday, May 24, 2017 at 6 p.m.

Eric Baetscher, WikiCommons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mass_statehouse_eb1.jpg

The State legislature is moving closer to agreeing on a budget for next fiscal year, but they'll have to deal with unstable tax revenue receipts as they figure out how to spend taxpayers' $40 billion.

Kathryn Eident talked with WCAI's State House reporter Mike Deehan, who's been been keeping an eye on Beacon Hill, to learn more.

Whaling City Golf Course

New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell announced plans  Thursday to convert half of the city's golf course into a business park. 

The city is working with a quasi-governmental agency called Mass Development to develop the park. Mitchell says it's the perfect place to attract manufacturers; it's near the highway, an airport and even a rail line.  He says construction will start in 2019. Kathryn Eident talked with Mitchell to learn more.  

Town of Lexington, lexingtonma.gov

A former Fall River city councilor is pushing to get June designated as "Seatbelt Awareness Month" in Massachusetts. The motive is personal; Mike Miozza lost his granddaughter, Hannah Raposo, when she lost control of her car on her way to the prom last year. She was not wearing her seatbelt and died in the crash.

Kathryn Eident talked spoke with Miozza about his effort, which includes testimony on Beacon Hill, and a petition with 4,000 signatures of support.

John Phelan bit.ly/2rd445K

A Barnstable County judge has set a trial date for a former Coast Guard member accused of killing a fellow officer two years ago in Bourne.  

Adrian Loya will face a jury beginning August 7th, in Barnstable Superior Court.

Loya is charged with the murder of Lisa Trubnikova at her home in Monument Beach on February 5th, 2015. The attack also injured her wife, Anna, and a responding Bourne police officer.

Alecia Orsini/WCAI

The Justice Department in recent months has directed local police to hold detained immigrants until federal immigration officials arrive. But some cities in Massachusetts won’t comply unless the immigrant is wanted for a serious crime. Not everyone agrees on which is the right approach, and the debate has focused new attention on so-called sanctuary cities.

Homeless Prevention Council

A recent survey found that more than 320 Cape Codders have recently been, or are homeless. That number includes young adults and children, a subset that often faces unique dangers and issues when it comes to safe housing.

 Kathryn Eident talked with Homeless Prevention Council director Hadley Luddy. Her organization is conducting a survey aimed at youth age 25-and-under, and is using strategies to reach them where they're most likely to be found: on their laptops and smart phones. 

Click here to go to the survey.

T.S. Custadio goo.gl/z4orD1 / goo.gl/KxOKu

Residents in several Lower Cape towns will consider upcoming Town Meeting articles similar to the "sanctuary city" declarations in Boston and Somerville. Those declarations discourage local officials and police from enforcing federal immigration laws without a judge’s order.

As WCAI’s Kathryn Eident reports, some Cape residents think the declaration of a so-called "safe community" is vital to protecting immigrants’ rights, while others say the idea has raised more questions than answers.

Patrick Flanary

Cape Cod business owners are bracing for their most unpredictable season in memory. Typically, about 3,000 seasonal workers carrying what's known as an H-2B visa travel to the Cape and Islands for work. Not this year. Only a fraction of them are approved to come back, which could mean devastating effects on small businesses. 

UMass Amherst College of Natural Sciences

Spring is in full gear, and in addition to more daylight, warmer temperatures, and blooming plants, ticks are back on the prowl.

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