The Local Food Report

    

with Elspeth Hay and Ali Berlow

The Local Food Report can be heard every Thursday morning at 8:45am and afternoon at 5:45pm, and Saturday morning at 9:35.

An avid locavore, Elspeth Hay lives in Wellfleet and writes a blog about food, Diary of a Locavore. Elspeth is constantly exploring the Cape, Islands, and South Coast and all our farmer's markets to find out what's good, what's growing and what to do with it.

Ali Berlow lives on Martha's Vineyard and is the author of "The Food Activist Handbook; Big & Small Things You Can Do to Help Provide Fresh, Healthy Food for Your Community." Foreword by Alice Randall, Storey Publishing. You can reach her at her website, aliberlow.com.

The Local Food Report is produced by Jay Allison and Viki Merrick of Atlantic Public Media.

The Local Food Report is made possible by the support of the Local Food Chain.

Elspeth Hay

Rachel Hutchinson of Brewster has a deep respect for local clams.

“The Northern Quahog, or our hardshell clam, is a very important species all over Cape Cod," Hutchinson says. "It’s been here since Indian times, so it’s kind of one of our level species, something shell fishermen have always had to harvest. Where there have been booms and busts in other species, the quahog has always been a dominant species for our wild harvesters, as well as for our aquaculture industry.”

Elisabeth Swan, 2017

Here’s what I know about asparagus: it’s delicious, usually green, and, most importantly for us, my friend Scott Britton grows it in North Falmouth. But his doesn’t look anything like the tidy bundles you find in the supermarket. And it sure doesn’t taste like supermarket asparagus—which is exactly what led Scott and his wife Liz to growing their own. It all started when  some friends gave them some wild asparagus….

Elspeth Hay

This time of year at the farmers markets, lettuce is the variety queen. It comes in heads and leaves, reds and greens, crisp hearts and soft butter leaves. Over the past few weeks, I’ve spoken to farmers about growing lettuce, and what varieties they like.

Ali Berlow

Claus is a 3rd grader at the Chilmark School, and he was one of my lunch buddies. We sat together in the school’s makeshift cafeteria, in the community center next to the school. Fresh fish, pollock, was on the menu, and Claus wasn’t all that sure about it.

Photo by Ali Berlow

The green crab (Carcinus maenas) arrived on the shores of Massachusetts in the 1800s. It is described as an alien or invasive species, because of its negative impacts on economically valuable shellfish stocks like clams and bay scallops—though there may be culinary uses in its future, if we cooks get creative.

 

Elspeth Hay

Helen Miranda Wilson grows five kinds of mint and each one has a story. The first comes from her mother’s close friend Nina Chavchavadze, who moved a piece of the plant from her garden in South Wellfleet to Helen’s family property in 1946.

Mr.TinDC goo.gl/8ZmNS1 / goo.gl/cefU8

“Pawpaw is a tree that will grow here, and was growing here, actually, before the Europeans came,” Eliza Travesino said, as we stood in her Brewster backyard nursery, which holds about a thousand tiny trees. “It can grow from about 12-to-25 feet. It needs a few individuals to pollinate, it’s not self pollinating. And it also produces fruit”

Ali Berlow

Olivia Pattison, 30, is a bread baker living on Martha’s Vineyard.

“I’m an artist at heart,” she told me. “So I like to mix it up. I sprout things, and I ferment stuff, and I soak other things.”

Ali Berlow

This is one of those stories about a hometown kid who grows up, moves away to go live the world, and then, after a few years of adventures and figuring it all out, the young man returns home to his roots. "Home" in this story is New Bedford, and the kid’s name is Brandon Roderick.

keepps goo.gl/TBgpu6 / goo.gl/lrxVf4

Elspeth Hay: Almost every week, late Friday or early Saturday, my house runs out of milk. We belong to a milk co-op; each Sunday a different local family takes turns driving to Dartmouth and bringing back milk for every family in the group. The amount we get is the closest to what we need, but it doesn't always last us until the following Sunday. 

Stijn Nieuwendijk bit.ly/2nZhq1v / bit.ly/OJZNiI

It’s seed ordering time again. While the cold blows in under the doors and through cracks in the windows, the catalogs pour in through the mail. And it’s time to start thinking about this year’s gardens. What are we going to plant? Well, together with his wife, Peter Staaterman runs Longnook Meadows Farm in Truro, and he has an idea.

David Constance

Ryan Mann is the Outreach and Stewardship Coordinator for the Harwich Conservation Trust. This time of year, he spends most days at a dam where the head of the Herring River meets Hinckley Pond.

“Herring are migratory fish,” Mann tells me. “They’re called anadromous fish—meaning that they live most of their lives in sea, and then they come up once a year to spawn.”

wayne marshall / flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Every winter around this time, Andrea Thorrold stocks her pantry. But she doesn’t do it at the store. Instead, she drives three hours to Western Massachusetts to pick up approximately 100 pounds of grains and beans to see her family through the year.

Photo by Ali Berlow

  Rukia Bilal arrived in the states as a Somali-Bantu refugee when she was 14 years old. Today she's farming at the Flats Mentor Farm, a program of World Farmers in Lancaster, MA. As a successful beginning farmer, she's looking to expand her business to include selling her produce to grocers, and farmers' markets and making and selling her homemade  sambusas. 

 

 

 

Elspeth Hay

Jayde Dilks grew up in a small, seaside town in Northeastern England. In 2006 she came to Wellfleet for an internship, fell in love with the area and the man who is now her fiancé, and decided to stay. Today she spends her nights managing a Provincetown restaurant and her mornings in her growing garden. Recently we sat down in my kitchen to talk about her seed order for this year.

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