The Fishing News


with Steve Junker

Fishing News is wrapped for 2015. Join us for another season beginning in May 2016. 

Each week during saltwater fishing season Steve Junker checks in with the folks at On the Water magazine and others to find out who's catching what where around the Cape and Islands—and how they're doing it.  

For a detailed weekly Fishing Forecast, check out On the Water.

Earlier seasons of The Fishing News are available on our archives page.

The Fishing News is made possible in part with support from Arey's Pond Boat Yard on Pleasant Bay in Orleans.


William Warby / flickr / CC BY 2.0

As we head into the last weekend of September, local anglers are looking toward the fall run, when fish migrating southward will pass through our waters. The question every year is: will the fall run be a good one?

Judging by how this season has set-up, there's reason to believe this fall could bring great fishing. / CC BY-SA 2.5

Off the tip of Cape Cod right now there’s plenty of excitement over bluefin tuna. Anglers looking for a thrill have been going for bluefin not with old-school fighting chairs and broomstick rods, but with spinning tackle, something like you would use for striped bass, beefed up just a little.

Kevin Blinkoff /

False albacore – or albies – are built for speed. They surface here briefly, then disappear, then re-surface way over there. So why would you go fishing for them from a kayak?

For the thrill and the challenge, obviously.

Public Herald / flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

There is some wildly good fishing going on now, mostly thanks to the abundance of bait in the water – especially all that peanut bunker. We’re seeing albies on the south side, bluefish in Buzzards Bay, and striped bass in Cape Cod Bay and the Canal. And some spectacular blitzes are popping up, especially for false albacore.

Wikimedia commons

If you walk down by the water right now along almost any dock or jetty, it's likely you’ll see schools of tiny fish swimming around. Seems like they’re everywhere this time of year. As a category, they're called baitfish, and they have a big impact on our late-summer fishing.

Eric Heupel / flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Late August, the striper and bluefish bite has dwindled, the bonito are a rumor, the funny fish have not yet arrived... what's an inshore angler to do?

How about this: enjoy an evening going for blue crabs.

SomeDriftwood / flickr / CC2.0

You find periwinkles in almost every rocky nook of our tidal coastline: small snail-like creatures clinging onto boulders, lining tide pools. Pluck one off and roll it in your palm for a few seconds, then watch as the periwinkle pokes out from its shell as if to get its bearings.

Periwinkles - the common species is littorina littorea - also make good eating, and they are an often overlooking shellfishing resource.

composite: wesbl / Nils Rinaldi / Public Herald / flickr / CC2.0

Just about every fisherman has a camera in his pocket now, thanks to the smart phone. But face it, that doesn't mean you know how to take a good picture of your catch.

S Junker

We're blessed to have such great coastline to fish. From jetties, canal-side, backwater estuaries, or beaches, an angler can cast for a wide variety of fish. But some fishing is best - or only - done from the water. If you don't have a boat for that, booking a charter might be your next best option.

Scup don't get a lot of publicity. You can't even find them in most fish markets on the Cape and Islands. But scup - or "porgy," as they're also known - can be delicious to eat. And they sure are fun for kids to catch.