The Fishing News

    

with Steve Junker

Each week during saltwater fishing season Steve Junker checks in with the folks at On the Water magazine and others to find out who's catching what where around the Cape and Islands—and how they're doing it.  

  For a detailed weekly Fishing Forecast, check out On the Water.

Earlier seasons of The Fishing News are available on our archives page.
 

The Fishing News is made possible in part with support from Arey's Pond Boat Yard on Pleasant Bay in Orleans.

 

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If you walk down by the water right now along almost any dock or jetty, it's likely you’ll see schools of tiny fish swimming around. Seems like they’re everywhere this time of year. As a category, they're called baitfish, and they have a big impact on our late-summer fishing.

Eric Heupel / flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Late August, the striper and bluefish bite has dwindled, the bonito are a rumor, the funny fish have not yet arrived... what's an inshore angler to do?

How about this: enjoy an evening going for blue crabs.

SomeDriftwood / flickr / CC2.0

You find periwinkles in almost every rocky nook of our tidal coastline: small snail-like creatures clinging onto boulders, lining tide pools. Pluck one off and roll it in your palm for a few seconds, then watch as the periwinkle pokes out from its shell as if to get its bearings.

Periwinkles - the common species is littorina littorea - also make good eating, and they are an often overlooking shellfishing resource.

composite: wesbl / Nils Rinaldi / Public Herald / flickr / CC2.0

Just about every fisherman has a camera in his pocket now, thanks to the smart phone. But face it, that doesn't mean you know how to take a good picture of your catch.

S Junker

We're blessed to have such great coastline to fish. From jetties, canal-side, backwater estuaries, or beaches, an angler can cast for a wide variety of fish. But some fishing is best - or only - done from the water. If you don't have a boat for that, booking a charter might be your next best option.

Scup don't get a lot of publicity. You can't even find them in most fish markets on the Cape and Islands. But scup - or "porgy," as they're also known - can be delicious to eat. And they sure are fun for kids to catch.

Jessica Langlois / flickr / BIT.LY/1CCZP4R

It's a fine pastime to stand in July's warm waters and root about for this evening's dinner. My wife insists the best way to hunt for quahogs is with the toes, ooching along the shallows on a likely beach. She has a knack for it that I don't. She also has strong and brave toes.

Eric Heupel / flickr / http://bit.ly/OJZNiI

Warming waters bring smiles to beachgoers.

For anglers, it's a little more complicated. As we head into July and water temperatures climb up over 70 degrees, the striped bass action slows down. But that doesn't mean the fishing has to let up any. 

Luyen Chou / flickr / CC2.0

Fishing is a seasonal pursuit. And as any vegetable gardener can tell you, it's important to have a strategy for how to preserve each season's abundance, to enjoy it in later times when the season is past.

So you hooked into plenty of bluefish? You brought home a small haul of sea bass? What are your options when you've caught enough fish that you want to save some for another day?

Luyen Chou / flickr / CC2.0

Catching a fish, only to return it alive to the water, may seem counter-intuitive. Especially if it's a trophy-size striper. But it's happening more often than you might expect, and becoming increasingly popular.

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