A Cape Cod Notebook

by Robert Finch

A Cape Cod Notebook can be heard every Tuesday morning at 8:45am and afternoon at 5:45pm.

A nature writer living in Wellfleet, Robert Finch has written about Cape Cod for more than forty years. He is the author of nine books of essays, most recently a second collection of his radio scripts, “A Cape Cod Notebook – 2,” published by Clock & Rose Press and available at roses-books.com.

A Cape Cod Notebook won the 2006 and 2013 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.

For archives of A Cape Cod Notebook, including programs dating from before November 2012, go to the Cape Cod Notebook Archives.

Graham Baker bit.ly/2a2khOS / bit.ly/OJZNiI

Cape Cod is a region that is usually spoken of, even by year-round residents, as if it were one fairly homogeneous place, with bigger or smaller waves, and perhaps some variation in traffic from season to season. I have lived here for over 40 years, and I am still learning about how different the various parts of this slim, sandy peninsula are.

Ib Aarmo bit.ly/29vZinh / bit.ly/OJZNiI

The other day I was watching a flock of terns diving into an inlet after sand eels. They would hover seven or eight feet in the air on whirring wings and fanned out tails, then drop like arrows beneath the fast-sliding currents, emerging a few seconds later with wriggling sand eels in their beaks.

Robert Finch

One of my wife Kathy’s favorite sayings is that, in recounting your vacation experiences, what most listeners want to hear is not the good or pleasant things that happened, but rather the minor disasters and near-catastrophes – the things that didn’t quite seriously hurt you. 

Nesson Marshall bit.ly/28Of1l4 / bit.ly/1hYHpKw

About a third of a mile east of Route 6 in my hometown of Wellfleet, one comes upon the longest remaining continuous stretch of the original King's Highway, the first road deliberately laid out down the entire length of Cape Cod. This road gets its name from the fact that in 1660, King Charles II of England gave a royal grant to have this road constructed.

On Grief Delayed

Jun 21, 2016
mgstanton http://bit.ly/1VXzLse / http://bit.ly/OJZNiI

My father was a quiet man. He rarely asserted himself in a conversation. He was a quiet man, but he was a decisive one, who hardly ever consulted anyone else in making decisions. I remember as a child that every few years he would go out on a Saturday morning. When he came back he would toss a set of keys to my mother, his way of announcing to all of us that he had just bought a new car.

Rover Thor http://bit.ly/1Ux1uL3 / http://bit.ly/1jNlqZo

One day last week, Kathy and I took some time off and spent several hours at one of our favorite ponds: a small, clear, kettle-hole pond hidden deep in the Wellfleet woods.

When we got to the pond, the morning mist had burned off and the day had turned sunny and pleasantly warm. 

Lessons of the Shed

Jun 7, 2016
Robert Finch

Some of you may recall a couple of programs I did last January about building a shed - a project I worked on sporadically over the fall and winter. All through our relatively mild and almost-snowless winter I would grab a few days of warm weather to continue working on the shed.

Bob MacInnes / flickr / CC BY 2.0

Last week I described how a mother fox had given birth to four fox kits under the shed next to our house. For several days we watched the kits playing on a patch of open ground just outside the shed. But, sensing our presence, or so we assumed, the mother fox, or vixen, had apparently removed them to a new location. 

Robert Finch

The fox is back, and this time she has four kits with her. It was the last week of April when we began hearing those weird, high, harsh shrieks at night – fox alarm, or fox mating calls, I was told.

Robert Finch

There’s a little dirt road in our town that’s been getting a lot of attention lately. Its name is High Toss Bridge Road, and how it got that unusual name is a story in itself, but I’ll save that for last.

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