Weekly Bird Report

Andy Sewell / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

In birding terms, May is fleeting beauty. May quickly ages into June, and the bejeweled migrant warblers that adorned our trees for a few weeks move on to more northerly forests to breed.

Jess Huddy / massaudubon.org

Did you catch it? Bird-a-thon fever was in the air this past weekend! Mass Audubon’s flagship annual fundraiser, Bird-a-thon pits sanctuary against sanctuary in two important categories: fundraising and birding. 

Peter Flood

In this week's Bird Report, Mark Faherty tells us about a newly-arrived stranger to the shores of Provincetown.

Mark Faherty

Identifying and tracking birds is important during the Spring Migration.   Mark Faherty has more in this week's Bird Report.

Mass Audubon

It's a busy time in the birding world.  The spring migration is underway.  Mark Faherty tells us more in this week's Bird Report.

northtexasdrifter.blogspot.com

It’s getting to be late April, which means backyards will soon be humming with an especially kinetic kind of ornithological activity.

stonebird / flickr

I was in the parking lot of a bayside beach in Truro recently when I heard a sound I couldn’t place - a strange, high pitched wail drifting in from somewhere off toward the beach. It wasn’t something I’d ever heard before – like the noise from some unfamiliar construction machine working in the distance.

batwrangler / fickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Recently, one of our more flamboyant seasonal residents has been performing at a variety of obscure local venues, venues that you might describe as off-off-off Broadway. Performances generally take the form of a one man show, and they only work nights, so don’t even think about catching a matinee.

Mark Faherty

Every March, usually sometime around St. Patrick’s Day, the first Piping Plover scouts arrive back on Cape Cod beaches. Whether these first arrivals are local nesters or migrants on their way to beaches in further north, they always seem to cause a panic.

Mark Faherty

We should all be jealous of ospreys. They’re way better at fishing than we are. They spend their winters on sun-drenched lagoons in Venezuela and they visit Cuba annually without violating US law. 

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