Space & Physics

The 1957 International Geophysical Year helped build bridges between American and Russian scientists, even as Cold War tensions continued.
Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Designed by Ervine Metzl. / U.S. Postal Service; National Postal Museum

To say that global nuclear politics is in flux is an understatement. President Trump has announced that the U.S. is withdrawing from the Iran nuclear deal. Meanwhile, he is planning a summit with North Korea in June. Scientific collaboration and cooperation has played an important part in nuclear diplomacy between the U.S. and Russia for decades, and could be a tool in our shifting relationships with Iran and North Korea. 

Two different forms of light have showed up in recent science headlines. Nature multi-media editor Shamini Bundell explains: light from first stars hints at dark matter. Astronomers have detected the fingerprint of light from a period known as the Cosmic Dawn, when the earliest stars were forming.

A total solar eclipse is seen on August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon.
NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

The March for Science drew thousands of science supporters, but the science event of the year was the Great American Eclipse, with millions of viewers highlighting an unexpected enthusiasm. Missions to Jupiter and Saturn also grabbed headlines. Gravitational wave researchers scored a Nobel Prize, and then announced an even bigger accomplishment – both seeing and hearing a neutron star collision. And President Trump calls for a return to deep space, at the expense of earth science.

NASA

This fall marks 20 years since NASA began continuous, global measurements of life on Earth from space. This kind of thing is unprecedented, and it helps us get a much better idea of how climate change and other environmental factors are affecting life on Earth. 

NASA - Ball Aerospace

NASA and NOAA are teaming up to launch a new weather satellite on Friday. It’s going to make it easier for meteorologists to predict extreme weather events up to 7 days out. We talk to Vanessa Griffin, NOAA’s Director of Satellite Operations.