The Local Food Report

Photo by Ali Berlow

The green crab (Carcinus maenas) arrived on the shores of Massachusetts in the 1800s. It is described as an alien or invasive species, because of its negative impacts on economically valuable shellfish stocks like clams and bay scallops—though there may be culinary uses in its future, if we cooks get creative.

 

Elspeth Hay

Helen Miranda Wilson grows five kinds of mint and each one has a story. The first comes from her mother’s close friend Nina Chavchavadze, who moved a piece of the plant from her garden in South Wellfleet to Helen’s family property in 1946.

Mr.TinDC goo.gl/8ZmNS1 / goo.gl/cefU8

“Pawpaw is a tree that will grow here, and was growing here, actually, before the Europeans came,” Eliza Travesino said, as we stood in her Brewster backyard nursery, which holds about a thousand tiny trees. “It can grow from about 12-to-25 feet. It needs a few individuals to pollinate, it’s not self pollinating. And it also produces fruit”

Ali Berlow

Olivia Pattison, 30, is a bread baker living on Martha’s Vineyard.

“I’m an artist at heart,” she told me. “So I like to mix it up. I sprout things, and I ferment stuff, and I soak other things.”

Ali Berlow

This is one of those stories about a hometown kid who grows up, moves away to go live the world, and then, after a few years of adventures and figuring it all out, the young man returns home to his roots. "Home" in this story is New Bedford, and the kid’s name is Brandon Roderick.

keepps goo.gl/TBgpu6 / goo.gl/lrxVf4

Elspeth Hay: Almost every week, late Friday or early Saturday, my house runs out of milk. We belong to a milk co-op; each Sunday a different local family takes turns driving to Dartmouth and bringing back milk for every family in the group. The amount we get is the closest to what we need, but it doesn't always last us until the following Sunday. 

Stijn Nieuwendijk bit.ly/2nZhq1v / bit.ly/OJZNiI

It’s seed ordering time again. While the cold blows in under the doors and through cracks in the windows, the catalogs pour in through the mail. And it’s time to start thinking about this year’s gardens. What are we going to plant? Well, together with his wife, Peter Staaterman runs Longnook Meadows Farm in Truro, and he has an idea.

David Constance

Ryan Mann is the Outreach and Stewardship Coordinator for the Harwich Conservation Trust. This time of year, he spends most days at a dam where the head of the Herring River meets Hinckley Pond.

“Herring are migratory fish,” Mann tells me. “They’re called anadromous fish—meaning that they live most of their lives in sea, and then they come up once a year to spawn.”

Elspeth Hay

According to the US EPA, roughly a third of the trash we create is packaging, and most of that comes from food. A few years ago, Elspeth Hay started wondering why we use so much packaging to keep and transport our food. She learned about a woman named Bea Johnson in California whose family produces only a pint of trash a year, and got inspired to try to reduce the amount of packaging her own family was bringing home.

wayne marshall / flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Every winter around this time, Andrea Thorrold stocks her pantry. But she doesn’t do it at the store. Instead, she drives three hours to Western Massachusetts to pick up approximately 100 pounds of grains and beans to see her family through the year.

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