local food

The FlavoRx pilot study provided at-risk patients with prescriptions worth $30 at a farmer's market.
Francie Randolph / Sustainable CAPE

We all know that we’d be healthier if we ate more fruits and vegetables. Your doctor may have suggested that. But few of us actually do anything about it. But would that change if you actually got a prescription that covered the cost of fresh, locally-grown produce? That was the question at the heart of a recent pilot project on Cape Cod, called FlavoRx.

This cranberry wild rice salad predates Thanksgiving by, oh, maybe millenia, and could easily replace "traditional" stuffing.

Most schools across the country have contracts to get their meals from corporate food service providers. These providers are big, often multi-national companies that provide meals to schools, hospitals, and prisons.

They buy huge amounts of food from big, industrial farms at very low prices, making lunch inexpensive for the schools and profitable for the companies. Some schools have exclusive contracts, meaning they can only buy their food from the companies, and others have looser arrangements. Either way, school food budgets are based on these sorts of deals, which means there's very little money available for lunch.

Jenny Junker

The local food movement on the Cape and Islands has expanded to include raising animals for consumption. For our regions small farmers this raises the question, how do you slaughter the animals humanely and without having to drive hundreds of miles? Ali Berlow, founder of the Island Grown Initiative  joins us to talk about the way Martha’s Vineyard has addressed this issue.