Heard on WCAI's Morning Edition

Fall River recently elected 24-year-old Jasiel Correia to be its third mayor in less than a year, as well as the youngest mayor in the city’s history. Last fall, Correia defeated Sam Sutter, who was elected in the wake of former mayor Will Flanagan’s resignation last year.

In this interview with WCAI, Correia tells Morning Edition co-host Brian Morris that he wants to attract new businesses to the city and find ways to keep young people from leaving.

More than 500 Turtles Wash Up on Cape Cod Beaches

Jan 8, 2016
Kathryn Eident

Turtle stranding season has shaped up to be another record one-- more than 500 turtles have washed up along beaches from Barnstable to Provincetown since November, and the season has lasted longer than in previous years.

With more and more young people fleeing Cape Cod in pursuit of job opportunities, trade schools like the Upper Cape Cod Regional Technical High are becoming increasingly popular. And with so much interest in the schools programs, there's a pressing need to expand campus.

For nearly 50 years, the Upper Cape Cod Technical school has trained local students in trades like carpentry, horticulture, and auto repair. Superintendant, Robert Dutch says the goal is to keep the workforce and young people in the community.

wikiCommons

Many people wait until the end of the year to donate to their favorite charities. That way they can support the causes they care about, while also getting a deduction for tax time.

In Provincetown, some residents are threatening to withdraw their support from local charities because of a controversial new property tax that will take effect next year.

WCAI's Morning Edition Co-host Kathryn Eident reports.

Eversource

Liquid natural gas provides roughly 59 percent of New England’s electricity. Demand for this resource, which is piped in from out of state, has grown in recent years, but construction of new pipelines hasn’t kept pace.

New Documentary Highlights Cape's Opiate Crisis

Dec 16, 2015

The statistics are clear--Cape Cod is a major part of the growing state-wide opiate crisis. A new documentary premieres this week that goes beyond the numbers and highlights some of the Cape Codders affected by the crisis. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with "Heroin: Cape Cod, USA" director Steven Okazaki about the film, which premieres Thursday at Cape Cod Community College and on HBO December 28th.

capecodfd.com

Each year for more than a decade, Cape firefighters and police officers have gone "Homeless for the Holidays." They forgo the comforts of a warm home and bed for a few days to raise awareness of needy children and families on the Cape.

It all started when Bourne fire fighter Craig Poirer held the first sleep-out in 2002. He struck a chord with Cape Codders, and the event has grown. This year, eight Cape fire and police departments are participating from Bourne to Harwich.

Warner Bros.

"In the Heart of the Sea" - the true-life story of the Nantucket whaler Essex - is coming out in theaters Friday. The movie is based on a book of the same name, and chronicles the ship's crew after a whale attack in 1820 - events that inspired Hermann Mellville to write "Moby Dick."

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with author and Nantucket resident Nathaniel Philbrick about bringing the story from the page to the big screen.

Courtesy photo

Climate awareness is very much in the news this week with talks ongoing in Paris, and a Wellfleet resident is showing how music can play a role in that effort.
 
Harriet Korim is a longtime climate activist. She’s also a musician and songwriter, and one of her several guitars has a unique pedigree.
 
“(The guitar) was produced in collaboration between Live Earth, Al Gore’s big 07/07 global concert, and Gibson Guitars,” Korim said. “Although 25 were supposed to get made, less than 12 actually did get made.”

Entergy Corp.

Across the United States, eight nuclear power plants are either shutting down, or soon will be, including Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth, which will close by 2019.

But just because a plant will stop generating electricity doesn't mean there aren't safety and security issues that still need addressing.

Pages