Heard on WCAI's Morning Edition

Alecia Orsini

Thousands of counter-protesters are expected in Boston Common Saturday to protest a so-called Free Speech Rally.

WCAI’s Kathryn Eident checks in with State House reporter Mike Deehan about what is being planned, and how police are responding.

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The Legislature is on their August recess and Gov. Charlie Baker has been taking a little time off this week, but that didn't stop electoral politics from creating buzz on Beacon Hill. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan for an update. 

By Yerpo - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=32004988

Invasive species are not new to the region. Here on the Cape, just look around at the trees and you'll see evidence of the gypsy moth, an invasive species from Europe that gorged on leaves earlier this summer.

Barnstable County entomologist Larry Dapsis is keeping an eye on that, and the latest pest that may have come to Cape Cod to stay: The brown marmorated stink bug. This insect is native to Asia and is known for damaging both vegetable and fruit crops in the U.S. 

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Beacon Hill lawmakers are home in their districts for the slow month of August, but activists and special interest groups are staking their claims for what they want Massachusetts citizens to vote on next fall at the ballot box. 

WCAI’s Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan about what voters can expect next year.

Town of Acushnet

When someone is injured and needs an ambulance, the only pain medicine first responders have  onboard are narcotics, regardless of the seriousness of the injury. Now, state public health officials are considering allowing lower dosage pain killers, like Tylenol, to be stocked on ambulances, in light of the growing opioid epidemic.

Wellfleet Police Department

The Cape is a popular place to cycle, even if some of the region's road are a little less than bike friendly. In Wellfleet, police have continued a summer program of distributing bicycle lights to residents and workers, with the hope riders will be safer when riding at night.

WCAI’s Kathryn Eident talked with Wellfleet Police Chief Ron Fisette about the popular bike light program.

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Every Friday WCAI’s Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan to go over what's happening on Beacon Hill. This week, they discuss a rewrite of the state's new retail marijuana law. The bill finally made it to Governor Charlie Baker's desk, just in time for law makers to wind down the first part of their legislative session before the summer recess.

Alecia Orsini, WCAI

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced Tuesday it will issue 15-thousand more visas for temporary foreign workers.

Cape business owners and advocates are cautiously optimistic about the news of the so-called H2B visas. Many did not get enough workers to fill jobs for the current summer season because the original visa cap was reached last spring. There are a few potential hiccups—one is that employers must prove their business faces “irreparable harm” if they cannot hire more workers. 

Larry Madin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, http://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=9779&tid=3622&cid=14949

Cape officials have been installing a new sign to warn beach goers of another potential way to get hurt on the beach—a sting from a Portuguese man-of-war. There have been several sightings of the unusual, jelly fish-like creature on Cape beaches this summer. Most recently, one washed up on the beach at the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port.

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There's been a big shakeup inside the State House as lawmakers wind down their activity before breaking for the summer. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan for an update on what's keeping the legislature and the governor busy. 

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