groundtruth

The GroundTruth Project and WCAI are collaborating to support two environmental reporting fellowships for six months, based out of WCAI in Woods Hole. The stories explore environmental issues critical to the region, with an emphasis on how individuals and communities are coping with the realities of climate change.

Samantha Fields

Visitors to the Cape Cod National Seashore this summer will likely notice changes at some of the beaches. At Nauset Light in Eastham, there is now a long path down to the beach, instead of a staircase. And at Marconi in Wellfleet, there’s a brand new staircase for the second year in a row.

Both beaches seem to be hotspots for erosion right now. And the Seashore is trying to adapt. 

Samantha Fields

Prince Albert II of Monaco visited Woods Hole on Monday, and met with scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory. He also announced that his foundation, the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, will be supporting research at MBL for the first time. 

Pien Huang/WCAI

If you think your seasonal allergies are getting worse, could be you’re not imagining things. Changes in temperature, rainfall, and greenhouse gases are making the pollen season stronger and longer.

 

Flickr/fateish

Allergy season is expected to get worse in the Northeast with climate change. More heat, rain, and CO2 is causing plants to produce more pollen. Now you can add severe weather—and thunderstorms in particular—to the mix of bad news for allergy-sufferers.

FEMA/National Flood Insurance Program

 

On the Cape and Islands, the flood insurance business is booming. Bryan Braley is the flood insurance specialist at the Arthur D. Calfee Insurance Agency in Falmouth. He says that, while off-Cape agents in coastal areas like Hull, MA, average one or two flood insurance quotes a month, he’s putting together two a day.

Samantha Fields

The town of Sandwich is currently trying to pull off the biggest beach nourishment project that’s ever been done on Cape Cod, and one of the biggest in the state.

For more than 100 years, the town’s main beach has been starved of sand by its neighbor, the Cape Cod Canal.  

And that’s left both the beach, and the town, increasingly vulnerable to climate change. 

Union of Concerned Scientists

 

Warming seas and melting sea ice are causing sea levels to rise, and putting coastal homes at risk of chronic flooding—inundation that happens, on average, 26 times or more per year.

Pien Huang/WCAI

The storm that flooded Tess Korkuch’s neighborhood was six months ago, but the images are fresh in her mind and at her fingertips. She has photos and videos on her phone—a neighbor's bocce court three feet underwater, more water pouring through the streets—and she’s ready to show them to anybody who asks.

Courtesy Rick Anderson

Nationwide, 2017 was a record year for high tide flooding across the country, according to a new analysis out from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And that trend is projected to continue into 2018. In coastal communities across Massachusetts, people are starting to take notice. 

In the Shadow of Stilts

Jun 5, 2018
Pien Huang/WCAI

As surely as the sea level will rise, new homes on Surf Drive in Falmouth are going up—and up.

Samantha Fields

Meryden Kirby and her husband Bruce were not home the night of March 2nd, when the ocean pulled the foundation out from under their house.

They had heard the forecast, and knew they should leave.

Their home of 20 years, on Wood Avenue in Sandwich, was perched right on Town Neck – a beach that has eroded away dramatically in recent years. 

What Can You Do If Your Well Turns Salty?

May 17, 2018

 

Sometimes a saltwater incursion in the aquifer flushes itself out. But if it doesn’t look like your well is clearing out, Hillary Greenberg-Lemos, from Wellfleet’s Health and Conservation department, recommends the following steps:

Pien Huang

 

In the first week of February, Peter McMahon had the worst morning. He tried to make coffee with his tap water—and realized it was salt water.

Samantha Fields

The repeated damage caused by intensifying storms and coastal erosion is an issue facing many towns across the Cape region. Last week, Sandwich voters said it's worth $2 million to rebuild the town's marquee structure, even without any assurances about how long it'll last, or how well it'll hold up to the next storm.