The World on WCAI

Weekdays at 8:00pm

A one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe.

http://www.theworld.org/

Drought doesn't cause famine. People do.

1 hour ago
w
Siegfried Modola / Reuters

The United Nations announced this month that more than 20 million people in four countries are teetering on the edge of famine, calling the situation “the worst humanitarian crisis” since the end of World War II.

The key for avoiding the worst outcomes? Political will, experts say.

P
Jessica Pepper Peterson

When you’re poor, you have to make tough choices.

“I couldn’t afford to pay my heat bill. My gas got turned off,” says Bob Cook, who lost his $30,000-a-year job a few years back while working in the computer industry.

“I had to stay warm by using a small electric heater and have a blanket around myself to stay warm in the winter,” says Cook. “This happens to families.”

R
Bria Webb/Reuters

U
REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

Over President Donald Trump's first 100 days, we're asking him questions that our audience wants answers to. Join the project by tweeting this question to @realDonaldTrump with the hashtag #100Days100Qs.

#64. @realDonaldTrump President Trump, what are your plans for the Office of Global Women's Issues? #100Days100Qs

I took an interest in Yemen some years ago and began following events there for The World, our Boston-based radio show. Because the US has taken on a major role in the Yemen civil war — supplying weapons, logistical and intelligence support to one side in the conflict — I've become, from a distance, a conflict journalist. 

As international climate negotiators meet in Doha, Qatar, scientists are issuing a stark warning of possibly huge emissions of the greenhouse gas methane from the warming Arctic.

If you want to understand one of the ways that warming in the Arctic is affecting climate change, just light a match and stand back.

R
Reuters/Khaled Abdullah

Leaders in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and Washington, DC long argued, without much evidence, that Yemen's Houthi rebels are puppets of Tehran. Those arguments, which many saw as exaggerated, are now beginning to ring true.

j
Courtesy of Tonantzin Esparza

When the movie "Selena" opened in theaters back in 1997, it was an instant hit. That first weekend, the biopic starring Jennifer Lopez rang up more than $11 million in box office receipts, making it the No. 2 film in the country.

It had only been two years since singer Selena Quintanilla-Perez died of a gunshot wound, and her most dedicated fans in Texas lined up by the thousands to buy a ticket.

I
Baz Ratner/Reuters

He's 18. He's Jewish with dual Israeli and American citizenship and lives in southern Israel. But now his home, at least temporarily, is a jail.

The Israeli teenager was arrested Thursday in connection with the dramatic spike in bomb threats against Jewish community centers in the US over the past few months. 

Each week on The World, we feature a unique selection of music, and every week, we put together the highlights for you here.

"Traveling Mercies"

Emily Scott Robinson was one of the artists World host Marco Werman met at this year's South by Southwest music festival in Austin. She talked to Marco about her new song, "Traveling Mercies." Since President Donald Trump has called for a travel ban, the song has taken on a whole new meaning for her.

Pages