Marketplace on WCAI

Weekdays at 6:30pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth focus on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets. The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance.

http://www.marketplace.org/

The use of prison labor, and its meager compensation, has long been a contentious issue. But while it is private prisons that get a lot of media attention for their for-profit business model, wages for the incarcerated in public and federal prisons, which hold the vast majority of inmates, have declined over the past two decades.

How Atlanta attorneys are helping kids stay in school

10 hours ago

Kids in low-income neighborhoods tend to change schools more often than their peers. And studies show that can have a detrimental effect on their education. So this past year, one public school in Atlanta tried to break the trend — by providing families with lawyers.

At Thomasville Heights Elementary School, in southeast Atlanta, Christal Reynolds and Ayanna Jones-Lightsy have just started their day.

Reynolds, a community advocate, is already on the phone. She’s talking to a parent who needs her apartment windows replaced.

What is the best way to help people in need? Some economists argue, well, just give them money.

That's exactly what one man did. 

Once upon a time, there was a flamboyant entrepreneur named Percy Ross who made millions in plastics. In the '80s and '90s, Ross had a newspaper column out of Minnesota where he set himself up as “America’s Rich Uncle” and gave money to people who wrote in.

The United States, Mexico and Canada concluded their first round of NAFTA renegotiation talks in Washington, D.C. on Sunday. President Trump has been promising to renegotiate the agreement, signed in 1994, saying it has shifted jobs to Mexico and resulted in large trade deficits between the U.S. and its neighbors.

One hundred years ago, Skagway, Alaska was the entryway for fortune-seekers of the Klondike Gold Rush. Its present-day economy is dependent on a different sort of gold rush: cruise ship tourism.

But the people in Skagway are worried about losing their prime spot in the cruise market. That’s because a private company holds the key to the waterfront. 

If you’ve ever been on a cruise to Alaska, chances are good you stopped in Skagway. Lisa Chapple, a tour guide who is British, comes here every summer to show people around.

Could those symbols of Americana — the Jeep and Ram pickup truck — become Chinese? On today's show, we'll look at news that Great Wall Motor may be interested in buying Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. Afterwards, we'll discuss how businesses are benefiting from the exodus from Mar-a-Lago — President Trump's palm beach resort. Then we'll chat with writer Jacqui Shine about her Longreads profile on Percy Ross, a self-made millionaire who gave away his money to those who wrote into this newspaper.

As you might have heard, there's a solar eclipse happening today. But even if you're not in the so-called path of "totality," you can stream it on Twitter thanks to its partnership with the Weather Channel. Neil Katz, editor in chief of The Weather Company, joined us to talk about how it's going to film the eclipse and how the company thinks about programming in the digital age. Afterwards, we'll dive into issues with data privacy agreements. 

Doing the math on back-to-school tax breaks

Aug 18, 2017

Last week on the show, we talked a lot about the costs associated with school: the cost of sending kids back to school, the cost of teacher supplies and the cost of a poor education.

Rachel Abrams of The New York Times and Cardiff Garcia of FT Alphaville join us to discuss the week's business and economics news. On Friday, Stephen Bannon was pushed out of his role as chief strategist to president Donald Trump. We discuss what the move can mean for the markets. Also, we recap Trump’s stance on the violence in Charlottesville. With Trump alienating corporate America and Republicans admonishing him, can the White House withstand the latest political whiplash thrown its way?

The cargo shipping industry is turning things around

Aug 18, 2017

After the Great Recession, the cargo shipping industry overestimated how fast the consumer economy would bounce back. It’s been a tough few years, with empty space on many cargo ships that carry furniture, clothes and office supplies — pretty much all the stuff Americans buy in stories. But now, old ships are getting replaced with a fewer number of new, bigger vessels, owned by fewer companies. All that efficiency has freight rates climbing.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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