Robert Finch

Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.

Robert Finch has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. He is the author of six collections of essays, including "The Iambics of Newfoundland" (Counterpoint Press), and co-editor of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing." His new book, "The Outer Beach: A Thousand-Mile Walk Along Cape Cod’s Atlantic Shore," will be out in May.

His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday at 8:30am and 5:45pm.

http://minerdescent.com/2010/05/28/jeremiah-howes/

A walk among the departed of the Howes family at a cemetery in Dennis gives rise to contemplation and speculation, this week on A Cape Cod Notebook.

A Piano in the House

Nov 13, 2012

Prognostication

Nov 6, 2012

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch.  Bob points out that he recorded this essay before Superstorm Sandy arrived last week.

A Choir of Coyotes

Oct 30, 2012

Living with coyotes on Cape Cod.

Little Things, part 2

Oct 23, 2012

In part two, Bob continues his recollection of a major event 50 years ago this month – the Cuban missile crisis, when it seemed the United States and Soviet Union were on the brink of nuclear war. Bob was a young reporter for a small newspaper on the Outer Cape then. He wrote a column on the events of that time, calling it “Little Things,” evoking those events that make up our lives.

Little Things, part 1

Oct 16, 2012

Bob remembers a major event 50 years ago this month – the Cuban missile crisis, when it seemed the United States and Soviet Union were on the brink of nuclear war.  Bob was a young reporter for a small newspaper on the Outer Cape then. He wrote a column on the events of that time, calling it “Little Things,” evoking those events that make up our lives.

How Many Squirrels?

Oct 9, 2012

Salt Falls

Oct 2, 2012

gainesp2003 / http://www.flickr.com/photos/33403047@N00/

Robert Finch found himself one of the last people to see the summer's illustrious ursine visitor to Cape Cod.  Not long after he passed it on the road, authorities captured the bear for relocation.  Even before this chance encounter, he celebrated the bear's trek with poetry and historical recollection of nature's unending incursions. Check out the before-and-after essays.

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