Robert Finch

Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.

Robert Finch has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. He is the author of six collections of essays, including "The Iambics of Newfoundland" (Counterpoint Press), and co-editor of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing." His new book, "The Outer Beach: A Thousand-Mile Walk Along Cape Cod’s Atlantic Shore," will be out in May.

His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday at 8:30am and 5:45pm.

Joanna Vaughan bit.ly/2kPJKDi / bit.ly/1dsePQq

The coast assumes a different character in winter. In A Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch sets out on a solitary walk in the Provincelands, visiting the dune shacks that stand against the wind in a desolate landscape.

Niels Linneberg / http://www.flickr.com/photos/linneberg/5411013129

Used to be, bitter cold was an expected part of New England winter. In A Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch observes that in recent years cold snaps have come to seem more a novelty. During a recent spell of frigid weather, he walked out to admire how extreme conditions can make art of nature.

My Mother's Catalogs

Feb 4, 2013
Robert Finch

My mother passed away in the fall of 2005, at the age of 92.  She lives on, however, not only in the memory of those of us who knew and loved her, but apparently also in the U.S. Postal Service. For several years after her death, I, as her executor, continued to receive letters from friends who had not heard of her demise, pleas for donations to various charities, and offers for Florida resorts and dance classes, both of which she took advantage of up to the year of her death.

More persistently than any of these, however, is the continued appearance of retail catalogs addressed to her in my mailbox. These are not just any catalogs, but are targeted at a specific demographic: women of my mother’s generation who identified themselves primarily as “homemakers.”

Audio posted above

Vern Laux

On Nauset Beach, Robert Finch contemplates the presence of eiders, and their embodiment of a natural community. 

H. K. Cummings / Snow Library Digital Collections

Early Cape Cod photographer H. K. Cummings maintained a mistress for more than 50 years, even vacationing with her and his wife. On A Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch continues the recollections of Rowena Myers. She explains the way a small town can assimilate unconventional relationships and keep a public secret.

View some of H. K. Cummings' historical photographs of Orleans and its people and environments at the website of the Snow Library.

H. K. Cummings / Snow Library Digital Collections

  The glass-plate photographs of H. K. Cummings bring to life Cape Cod in an earlier time. On A Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch recalls Cummings from the vantage of one who knew him, Rowena Myers.

You can view some of H. K. Cummings' historical photographs of Orleans and its people and environments at the website of the Snow Library.

Robert Finch

How far away do you need to go, to be from 'away'? On A Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch brings us another story about his old friend Rowena Myers of Orleans. She lived in the large yellow Greek revival farmhouse at the head of Town Cove from her birth in 1904 to her death in 1996. She recalled for Bob a story from her childhood, when a teacher singled out some classmates by their family names and origins.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/qnr/

Robert Finch's late friend Rowena Myers had a distaste for anything new. On A Cape Cod Notebook, Bob remembers when, as one of her "boys," he repaired her doorbell. She lived in the large yellow Greek Revival farmhouse at the head of Town Cove in Orleans from her birth in 1904 to her death in 1996. During the month of January, the Snow Library in Orleans will be presenting the annual Rowena Myers Concert Series on Saturday afternoons at 4 p.m., funded by a bequest from her estate.

Ricardo Wang / flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Building a night fire at the edge of a frozen kettlehole illuminates a world captured in stark relief. In A Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch creeps out upon the ice on all fours to peer into a frozen realm, where he finds surprising life.  

In Praise of Downtowns

Dec 19, 2012
: from the movie Voices from the Basement

A nature writer turns his observational powers on the city, as Robert Finch considers Boston's Downtown Crossing. He finds surprises, and cause for wonder, in this urban commercial crossroads, on this week's Cape Cod Notebook.

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