Robert Finch

Robert Finch is a nature writer living in Wellfleet. 'A Cape Cod Notebook' won the 2006 New England Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Radio Writing.

Robert Finch has lived on and written about Cape Cod for forty years. He is the author of six collections of essays, including "The Iambics of Newfoundland" (Counterpoint Press), and co-editor of "The Norton Book of Nature Writing." His new book, "The Outer Beach: A Thousand-Mile Walk Along Cape Cod’s Atlantic Shore," will be out in May.

His essays can be heard on WCAI every Tuesday at 8:30am and 5:45pm.

garden beth goo.gl/tQKPo8 / goo.gl/uk4xos

An end-of-day walk on Nauset Beach provides Robert Finch an opportunity to wonder anew at the Cape's beauty, in this week's Cape Cod Notebook.

Kyletracysrs goo.gl/evHzCq / goo.gl/KxOKu

A trip to Sarasota allowed naturalist Robert Finch an opportunity to take up a type of leisure that he wouldn't normally consider at home, including sunbathing poolside and watching golfers and sandhill cranes on the links.  He writes about it in this week's Cape Cod Notebook. 

Steve Herring goo.gl/yCRtCt / goo.gl/VAhsB

Walking up from the beach, Robert Finch came upon a freshly dead seabird that he initially dismissed as a common gull. But a closer inspection revealed it was a pelagic bird rarely seen inshore: a fulmar. The questions of how it had come there, and how it received the wound that killed it, prompted this week's Cape Cod Notebook.

Kenneth C. Zirkel bit.ly/2o0qlyj / bit.ly/1SrbRBk

Old stone walls are one of the emblems of the New England landscape.  They're the legacy of the glaciers that sculpted the land. Robert Finch reflects on the effort it takes to build a stone wall, and on the messages that stone walls seem to convey to us over time, in this week's Cape Cod Notebook.

Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism

In Brewster, Robert Finch came across a duck blind that once belonged to the Nickerson family, and its view of ducks adrift on the pond in winter inspired this week's Cape Cod Notebook.

A day spent clearing landscape debris segues to an inspired appreciation of Rachmaninov, in this week's essay from a Cape Cod Notebook. 

cardcow.com bit.ly/1Qa5M9i

At a recent dinner with old friends, someone brought up the topic of the “Target Ship.” For over a half a century, the target ship was a familiar and legendary sight in Cape Cod Bay for those of us who lived near the elbow of the Cape. 

Joanna Vaughan bit.ly/2kPJKDi / bit.ly/1dsePQq

The coast assumes a different character in winter. In A Cape Cod Notebook, Robert Finch sets out on a solitary walk in the Provincelands, visiting the dune shacks that stand against the wind in a desolate landscape.

The Great Good Place

Feb 7, 2017
Steve Snodgrass bit.ly/2kEgbmq / bit.ly/1mhaR6e

Sometimes wandering into a coffee shop can enter you into a whole new world.

Vern Laux

On Nauset Beach, Robert Finch contemplates the presence of eiders, and their embodiment of a natural community. 

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