Kathryn Eident

co-Host Morning Edition, Reporter

Kathryn Eident is co-host for Morning Edition with Brian Morris. She first began producing stories for WCAI in 2008 as a Boston University graduate student reporting from the Statehouse. Since then, Kathryn’s work has appeared in the Boston Globe, Cape Cod Times, Studio 360, Scientific American, and Cape and Plymouth Business Magazine.

She also worked in commercial radio, first as a reporter, then news director, at Cape Cod Broadcasting, four commercial radio stations in Hyannis. In between, Kathryn spent several years sailing as a deckhand and mess attendant on Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution research ships, and has written for the Institution’s magazine, Oceanus.

Ways to Connect

T.S. Custadio goo.gl/z4orD1 / goo.gl/KxOKu

Residents in several Lower Cape towns will consider upcoming Town Meeting articles similar to the "sanctuary city" declarations in Boston and Somerville. Those declarations discourage local officials and police from enforcing federal immigration laws without a judge’s order.

As WCAI’s Kathryn Eident reports, some Cape residents think the declaration of a so-called "safe community" is vital to protecting immigrants’ rights, while others say the idea has raised more questions than answers.

Nantucket Cottage Hospital

The 121st Boston Marathon was a success, but a Nantucket doctor who has run nearly 50 races sat this one out because of an injury.

Kathryn Eident talked with Dr. Tim Lepore about his life as a runner and whether he'll be lacing up his running shoes again. 

UMass Amherst College of Natural Sciences

Spring is in full gear, and in addition to more daylight, warmer temperatures, and blooming plants, ticks are back on the prowl.

Jeff Robertson, Associated Press

The maker of one of the nation’s most popular weed-killing products is coming under scrutiny. Recently released court documents suggest Monsanto, the maker of the weed killer Roundup, may have ghost-written research to make its product seem safer.

IFAW

Close to 100 dolphins have stranded on Outer Cape beaches since last fall, and rescuers are beginning to wonder if 2017 will be a record-setting year for dolphin strandings.

 

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Brian Sharp, director of the marine mammal rescue and research program at the International Fund for Animal Welfare, for an update.

 

 

Kathryn Eident

A group of middle and high school choir students have spent the last year getting ready for what may be the biggest concert of their lives: An appearance at the Vatican in Rome.

Dan Tritle

The Friday News Roundup.  WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks to area journalists about the top news stories of the week.  Her guests include Geoff Spillane of the Cape Cod Times; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Ann Wood of the Provincetown Banner; Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette; Cameron Machell of the Martha's Vineyard Times; and Ryan Bray of the Falmouth Enterprise.

Ben Allsup, Teledyne Webb Research

China returned an underwater glider to the United States this week, several days after seizing it from a U.S. Navy ship conducting research in the South China Sea.

It turns out that the torpedo-shaped device at the center of an international incident was made right here on Cape Cod, at a facility that develops equipment for both the Navy and for scientists.  

WCAI’s Kathryn Eident visited Teledyne-Webb to learn more about what gliders do and why the government uses these types of instruments.

 

Timothy K Hamilton bit.ly/2f1cB1k / bit.ly/OJZNiI

When she first heard about hospice care, Yarmouth resident Christine Greeley was dubious.

“I mean the term ‘hospice’ was kind of scary,” she said. “It really was like, ‘That’s for people who are dying next week, tomorrow, or something. This is the end of it, it’s going to be terrible.’”

Photo by Alecia Orsini

About a dozen people are gathered at the Barnstable Senior Center, sipping coffee and eating pie. They’re not here to socialize or play games—they’re here to talk about something many consider a taboo subject.

This is a Death Café, a free-form conversation about death guided by bereavement coordinator Brooks Reinhold. If the idea of a Death Café sounds strange, Reinhold hopes people aren’t put off by the name.

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