Kathryn Eident

co-Host Morning Edition, Reporter

Kathryn Eident is co-host for Morning Edition with Brian Morris. She first began producing stories for WCAI in 2008 as a Boston University graduate student reporting from the Statehouse. Since then, Kathryn’s work has appeared in the Boston Globe, Cape Cod Times, Studio 360, Scientific American, and Cape and Plymouth Business Magazine.

She also worked in commercial radio, first as a reporter, then news director, at Cape Cod Broadcasting, four commercial radio stations in Hyannis. In between, Kathryn spent several years sailing as a deckhand and mess attendant on Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution research ships, and has written for the Institution’s magazine, Oceanus.

Ways to Connect

Things look like they are about to heat up in the State Legislature, as Lawmakers prepare for the second half of their two-year session. WCAI's Kathryn Eident checks in with State House Reporter Mike Deehan to learn more.

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Several volunteers from the Cape are among scores of Red Cross volunteers who are traveling to Texas this week to help residents stranded by the weekend storm and flooding. They come from Bourne, Falmouth and Chatham.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Cape and Islands' Red Cross chapter director Hilary Greene about how they're getting there, what they'll be doing, and how long they might be in Texas.

Dan Tritle

WCAI's Kathryn Eident hosts a roundup of the week's news.  Her guests: Sean Driscoll from the Cape Cod Times; Josh Balling from the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror; Andy Tomolonis from the New Bedford Standard Times; Ann Wood from the Provincetown Banner; Sarah Brown from the Vineyard Gazette; Tim Wood from the Cape Cod Chronicle; and George Brennan from the Martha's Vineyard Times.

Alecia Orsini

Thousands of counter-protesters are expected in Boston Common Saturday to protest a so-called Free Speech Rally.

WCAI’s Kathryn Eident checks in with State House reporter Mike Deehan about what is being planned, and how police are responding.

On The Point, a discussion about denial. From rationalizing and blaming to outright lies, we examine a range of behavior that people engage in.  Psychiatrist Dr. Marc Whaley and psychologist Dr. Michael Abbruzzese join host Kathryn Eident in the studio.

J. Junker

Tips and tricks for getting the most out of your late summer garden, whether you grow vegetables or flowers.  WCAI's Kathryn Eident hosts entomologist and garden expert Roberta Clark, and takes listener questions.

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The Legislature is on their August recess and Gov. Charlie Baker has been taking a little time off this week, but that didn't stop electoral politics from creating buzz on Beacon Hill. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan for an update. 

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Invasive species are not new to the region. Here on the Cape, just look around at the trees and you'll see evidence of the gypsy moth, an invasive species from Europe that gorged on leaves earlier this summer.

Barnstable County entomologist Larry Dapsis is keeping an eye on that, and the latest pest that may have come to Cape Cod to stay: The brown marmorated stink bug. This insect is native to Asia and is known for damaging both vegetable and fruit crops in the U.S. 

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Beacon Hill lawmakers are home in their districts for the slow month of August, but activists and special interest groups are staking their claims for what they want Massachusetts citizens to vote on next fall at the ballot box. 

WCAI’s Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan about what voters can expect next year.

Town of Acushnet

When someone is injured and needs an ambulance, the only pain medicine first responders have  onboard are narcotics, regardless of the seriousness of the injury. Now, state public health officials are considering allowing lower dosage pain killers, like Tylenol, to be stocked on ambulances, in light of the growing opioid epidemic.

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