Kathryn Eident

Morning Edition Host & Senior Producer of News

Kathryn Eident is an award-winning journalist and co-hosts Morning Edition with Brian Morris. She began producing stories for WCAI in 2008 as a Boston University graduate student reporting from the Statehouse. Since then, Kathryn’s work has appeared in the Boston Globe, Cape Cod Times, Studio 360, Scientific American, and Cape and Plymouth Business Magazine.

She also worked in commercial radio, first as a reporter, then news director, at Cape Cod Broadcasting, four commercial radio stations in Hyannis. In between, Kathryn spent several years sailing as a deckhand and mess attendant on Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution research ships, and has written for the Institution’s magazine, Oceanus.

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Kathryn Eident / WCAI-FM

Earlier this year, China revamped its policies on how much contamination it would accept from recycling imports, and the changes are already starting to affect the recycling chain here in the U.S.

Wikicommons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sagamore_Bridge_-_South_Westerly_View.jpg

U.S. Senator Ed Markey was on the Cape late last week for a lengthy meeting with the Army Corps of Engineers. The topic: finding a way to fund building two new bridges to replace the aging Bourne and Sagamore bridges. WCAI's Kathryn Eident spoke with reporter Sarah Tan to learn more.   

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan about the latest happenings on Beacon Hill. This week, they discuss the so-called "Red Flag Bill" and the state Democratic Convention results.

Eident: Joining us as he does most weeks live from Boston is WCAI State House reporter Mike Deehan. Morning Mike.

Deehan: Good morning.

Town of Dennis

Officials in Dennis, Yarmouth and Harwich have proposed creating a tri-town entity to manage wastewater. Town Meetings in each of the towns approved the idea last month, but there is still a long way to go. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Dennis Board of Selectmen Chairman Paul McCormick to learn more.  

Courtesy of the Cape Cod Cooperative Extension

We're now deep within the active period for ticks on the Cape, Coast and Islands, and many of them harbor illnesses that can make humans sick--including Lyme, Babesiosis, Anaplasmosis and other diseases with sobering names. 

WCAI Morning Edition Host Kathryn Eident talked with Cape Cod Cooperative Extension Entomologist Larry Dapsis about this year's tick population, and how to protect ourselves.

Wikicommons creative commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lymantria_dispar_MHNT_Fronton_Male.jpg

The trees have leafed out across the Cape, islands and SouthCoast. In past years, those green leaves were quickly eaten up by gypsy and winter moths. WCAI's Kathryn Eident visited with Cape Cod Cooperative Extension Entomologyst Larry Dapsis to learn if we might see the same results this year.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House Reporter about the week's biggest news on Beacon Hill. This week, they talk about the Senate's budget process, the so-called Red Flag bill, and other legislation of interest. 

juliancyr.com

The Massachusetts Senate recently passed a series of amendments in a supplemental budget aimed at shoring up the state's finances for the rest of the fiscal year. That included an amendment filed by Cape Sen. Julian Cyr (D-Truro) to provide a more consistent source of funding for police departments to provide officer training.

WCAI’s Kathryn Eident talked with Cyr to learn more.

 

U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Chatham's Board of Selectmen has been pressuring U.S. Representative Bill Keating (D-Mass.) to continue his efforts to return a stretch of ocean off the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge to state and local control. Those waters were put under federal control when officials redrew boundaries in 2016, impacting some areas used for fishing. Chatham selectmen say efforts seem to have stalled, and even went as far as to put out a call to action to residents last week.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Morning Edition Producer Hayley Fager to learn more. 

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker has indicated he'd like to make some changes to a sweeping criminal justice bill he signed last month.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House reporter Mike Deehan about this, and other happenings on Beacon Hill, in their weekly segment. 

pilgrimpower.com

U.S. Rep. Bill Keating (D-Mass.) announced last week that the House passed a bill to speed up the process of moving spent nuclear fuel off local sites, like the Pilgrim Plant in Plymouth, to a federal holding facility.

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with Keating about this legislation, and about his efforts to help New Bedford fishermen in the so-called Codfather's fishing fleet get federal permission to start fishing again.

www.wealthramp.com

We've all been told how important it is to invest in the future, and there's a whole industry dedicated to retirement planning. But not all financial advisors are created equal, despite attempts to implement a proposed rule that would require anyone who gives retirement investment advice to sign an oath saying they're working in the customer's best interest. A court recently struck down the proposed so-called fiduciary rule, leaving many confused in its wake.

Beacon Hill investigators have found that former state Senate President Stan Rosenberg failed to protect the senate from Rosenberg's husband, Bryon Hefner, who now faces sexual assault and other charges.  

WCAI's Kathryn Eident talks with State House Reporter Mike Deehan about the report, and possible punishment for Rosenberg.   

Kathryn Eident

They’re hard to miss when you walk into the New Bedford Whaling Museum: four enormous whale skeletons suspended from the ceiling, nearly filling the 2-story space. There’s a humpback whale and a blue whale, but what catches most peoples’ eye is a pair of whales: a female North Atlantic Right Whale, and her calf—also a female.

www.airbnb.com

State House lawmakers passed a bill late last month that would add a tax to short-term rentals such as those listed on Air BnB. Cape lawmakers pushed for an amendment that would let their towns add a surcharge specifically designed to help pay for the region's looming wastewater pollution crisis.

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