Heather Goldstone

Science Editor and Host of Living Lab

Heather Goldstone is science editor at WCAI and host of Living Lab on The Point, a weekly show exploring how science gets done and makes its way into our daily lives. Goldstone holds a Ph.D. in ocean science from M.I.T. and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and spent a decade as researcher before leaving the lab to pursue journalism. She has reported extensively on Woods Hole’s unique scientific community and key environmental issues on Cape Cod. Her stories have appeared in outlets ranging from Cape Cod Times and Commercial Fishery News to NPR and PBS News Hour. Most recently, Goldstone hosted Climatide.org, an NPR-sponsored blog exploring present-day impacts of climate change on coastal life.

Ways to Connect

fda.gov

We've all heard that washing your hands is the best way to protect against infectious germs like the cold and flu. Now, new research suggests that it may also help lower your exposure to potentially harmful synthetic chemicals, like flame retardants.

Ronaldo Arthur Vidal / unsplash

Drinking coffee could help you live longer, and not by just a little bit.

Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn

Each month, we check in with the journalists at Nature News for a roundup of what they've been following. This month, we talk to Benjamin Thompson of the Nature podcast on these headlines.

Experts say FIFA can do better at treating concussions.
Pal Berge, http://bit.ly/2JbjXys

The FIFA men’s World Cup has been a been a tournament full of surprises and upsets. But it’s also been a example of how not to handle concussions, according to experts. And the problems started well before the latest World Cup. 

Samantha Fields

Last week, a leaked presentation from the acting director of NOAA hinted at some major new directions and initiatives for that agency. One of the most concrete goals: the United States should triple aquaculture production in the next decade.

A new survey suggests that many Americans think that robots are coming to take our jobs. The Brookings Institution asked 2000 Internet users whether they thought robots would be able to take over most human activities within 30 years, and over half said they thought it was somewhat or very likely. 

It's no secret that the majority of scientists have historically been white men. A lot of effort and attention in recent decades has gone into making science more diverse and inclusive. Emily Cooperdock is a post-doctoral scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and co-author of a study on the topic. She spoke with Living Lab Radio about science's progress on diversity in 40 years. 

World Cup soccer fans in Russia have been laughing, crying, and screaming as their favorite teams win or lose. But Russians themselves aren't known for their emotional displays. In fact, in the lead up to the World Cup, Russian workers actually got training on how to smile at visiting fans. Which raises a question: Why?

Sgt. 1st Class Gordon Hyde / Wiki Commons / https://bit.ly/2tM5qo9

Some new research may help us understand the divide over President Trump’s zero tolerance immigration policy. While the majority of Americans found the practice of separating families at the border objectionable, about a quarter of Americans supported the practice.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The federal agency that regulates what happens on, and in, the oceans is making some major policy changes, including some tweaks to its mission statement. That agency is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA. WCAI's Kathryn Eident talked with science correspondent and Living Lab Host Heather Goldstone to learn more. 

inventingtomorrowmovie.com

Laura Nix, film director, talks to Heather Goldstone on Living Lab about her new movie Inventing Tomorrow. It’s about teenage science innovators from around the globe who are creating cutting-edge solutions to confront the world’s environmental threats. 

Jackman Chiu / unsplash

We all know we feel better when we’re well-rested, but why do we sleep? And how much is enough?

Jeff Janowski, UNCW

Great white sharks have started filtering back into Massachusetts waters. Researchers are pretty sure food is what brings them here, but it’s hard to know for sure what sharks are thinking.

Michał Parzuchowski / unsplash

In the past two months, more than 2,300 immigrant children have been separated from their parents after crossing into the U.S. from Mexico. President Trump has issued an executive order ending the practice, but it’s not clear when or how the previously separated families will be reunited.

Some scientists worry they will have less access to large data sets now that net neutrality is gone.
NOAA (http://bit.ly/2K0YcWE)

It’s official – the net neutrality rules put into place by the FCC in 2015 went away on April 23 after being repealed by the Trump Administration in December.

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