Heather Goldstone

Science Editor and Host of Living Lab

Heather Goldstone is science editor at WCAI and host of Living Lab on The Point, a weekly show exploring how science gets done and makes its way into our daily lives. Goldstone holds a Ph.D. in ocean science from M.I.T. and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and spent a decade as researcher before leaving the lab to pursue journalism. She has reported extensively on Woods Hole’s unique scientific community and key environmental issues on Cape Cod. Her stories have appeared in outlets ranging from Cape Cod Times and Commercial Fishery News to NPR and PBS News Hour. Most recently, Goldstone hosted Climatide.org, an NPR-sponsored blog exploring present-day impacts of climate change on coastal life.

Ways to Connect

Roger Hanlon

We all know camouflage when we see it, or when we don’t, as the case may be. But what does that actually mean?

“Qualitatively, it’s pretty easy for people to say ‘that’s camouflaged’ or ‘it’s not,’” says Roger Hanlon, a senior scientist at MBL, whose research focuses on camouflage in marine animals. “But to grade camouflage or to quantify it somehow, really has hardly ever been attempted until very recently.”

International Press of Boston

In December 2015, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider saw an unusual disturbance in their signal that they couldn’t explain. They’re working right now to figure out whether it was a fluke, or a game-changing discovery.

Jayne Doucette / Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Oceans cover seventy percent of the Earth's surface is covered in water, and there's even more water trapped inside the Earth. Where did it all come from? And when? There have long been two possible answers to those questions: it could have been here since the very beginning, or it could have arrived later, carried by bombarding asteroids and comets.

The prevailing thought has been that the latter is more likely because, when the planets were forming nearly four and a half billion years ago, Earth's neck of the solar system would have been too hot for there to be water around.

Students from Jonah Maidoff's Resilient Communities course at Martha's Vineyard Public Charter School traveled to the Alaskan Arctic with climate scientists this summer.
Courtesy of Astrid Tilton

Last fall, Jonah Maidoff's Resilient Communities class at Martha’s Vineyard Public Charter School was planning a trip to Paris. They were to attend the U.N. climate negotiations and witness history in the making. But the trip was canceled after the November 13th terrorist attacks.

www.flickr.com/photos/cblue98/ / CC BY-SA 2.0

If consciousness is what makes us human, memory – it could be argued – is what defines us as individuals. Each of us carries within our brains a unique set of memories that, together, make up our life stories. But how do we remember? That is the question that drives Erin Schuman.

There Is No Tsunami of Autism Cases

Aug 29, 2016
Avery Books

The number of autism diagnoses has risen steadily in recent years and currently stands at one in 45 American children diagnosed each year. There’s been concern that the increase is being fueled by environmental causes, but a new history of autism research says the condition has always been common and is widely misunderstood.

National Park Service

The National Park Service turns one hundred on August 25. George Price, the superintendent of Cape Cod National Seashore, joins us for a conversation about our own national park.

Wikicommons

Lyme disease has reached epidemic proportions, and Cape Cod and the Islands represent a major epicenter of the disease. Between 2010 and 2014, Chilmark and Nantucket had the highest number of cases of Lyme disease per capita of anywhere in the state. 

Roughly 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year, transmitted through the bite of an infected deer tick. 

Daniel Colon-Ramos is associate professor of cell biology and neuroscience at Yale University.
Courtesy of Daniel Colon-Ramos

Daniel Colón-Ramos got the email just a few hours before he was due to lecture before a class of minority students in neuroscience at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), in Woods Hole. A teaching assistant had been expelled after threatening to burn a cross in front of an African-American student’s home. It’s an incident that might seem shocking to many, but to Colón-Ramos, it was the response that stood out.

http://bluewave-capital.com

Lighting has changed a lot since 1850. New Bedford has been in the thick of things, every step of the way. It began with the moniker “the city that lit the world,” earned with its leading role in the whaling industry. Later, the Whaling City became a hub of electrical manufacturing. Today, New Bedford boasts more solar power per capita than any other city in the continental United States. Still, the city is struggling to move beyond the legacy of pollution and economic challenges left bygone industries.

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