Brian Morris

co-Host Morning Edition, Reporter

Brian Morris began working with WCAI in 2005 as an independent reporter/producer, and joined the staff full time in December, 2013. He has contributed to the station's “Creative Life” series, produced the “Nautical Minutes” series of :60 vignettes about nautical life on the Cape and Islands, reported on South Coast issues, and provided field production support for "The Point." He is co-host of WCAI's Morning Edition.

Ways to Connect

Brewster Historical Society

Hellen Keller spent time in Brewster during several summers as a child. She was born in Alabama, and became deaf and blind at 19 months old. Keller’s connection to Brewster was through a local woman named Sophia Crocker-Hopkins, who ran a boarding house for summer visitors. 

Todd Kennelly

The Cape Cod Coliseum is a former entertainment venue in South Yarmouth that once hosted ice hockey games, professional wrestling matches, as well as some of most legendary acts in rock music.

The Coliseum opened in 1972. It was initially built as an arena for youth and amateur ice hockey matches, and was home to the Cape Cod Cubs of the Eastern Hockey League.

Nantucket Historical Association

In the 1830s, silk was all the rage in fashion. And Nantucket decided to get in on the action.

“There was a lot of speculation along the eastern seaboard about establishing silk in the United States,” said Nantucket resident and historian Barbara White.

So, two Nantucket entrepreneurs planted 4,000 mulberry trees in the Polpis area of the island.

“The trees got established, and in 1832, they opened a silk factory,” said White.

It was thought that the mulberry trees and the silk that they fed would thrive on Nantucket.

Dan Tritle

WCAI's Brian Morris hosts a panel of reporters talking about some of the top stories in the news.  His guests: Patrick Cassidy of the Cape Cod Times; Sam Houghton of the Mashpee Enterprise; Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle, Josh Balling of the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror; Ann Wood of the Provincetown Banner; Jim DeArruda of the New Bedford Standard-Times; and Barry Stringfellow of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

Brian Morris/WCAI

When someone loses the use of their limbs because of a traumatic injury, the emotional healing process can be long and difficult. It’s been shown that physical activity is one of the best ways to help that process along, but it takes the help of trained personnel and specially modified equipment. There’s a new program on Cape Cod that’s providing opportunities for those with severe injuries, helping them get outside on the water and the trails.

  

Brian Morris/WCAI

Each year, a Cape Cod ham radio club commemorates the role that wireless communication played in rescuing survivors from the Titanic in 1912.

The Club calls itself the Titanic/Marconi Association of Cape Cod. Their call sign is WIMGY, the last 3 letters of which were the same call sign of the Titanic.

Rick Pendleton hails from Braintree, but he comes to the Cape every year to participate in the event.

Brian Morris/WCAI

May 29th marks the 100th birthday of John F. Kennedy, the nation’s 35th President. Ann Mulligan of Brighton has a family connection to the late president. Her mother spent 49 years as the personal assistant to Cardinal Richard Cushing, who was Archbishop of Boston from 1944 to 1970. Cardinal Cushing was a close friend of the Kennedy family, officiating at JFK’s marriage to Jacqueline Lee Bouvier in 1953, and at his funeral Mass 10 years later following the President’s assassination in Dallas.

Alecia Orsini/WCAI

The Justice Department in recent months has directed local police to hold detained immigrants until federal immigration officials arrive. But some cities in Massachusetts won’t comply unless the immigrant is wanted for a serious crime. Not everyone agrees on which is the right approach, and the debate has focused new attention on so-called sanctuary cities.

Woods Hole Historical Museum

Though barely a trace remains today, the Pacific Guano Company operated for 26 years on what is now Penzance Point in Woods Hole, transforming what was a sleepy farming village into a thriving community.

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Years before John F. Kennedy became the nation’s 35th President, he spent a brief time as a journalist for Hearst Newspapers, witnessing a number of pivotal moments in U.S. history in the aftermath of World War Two.

The 28-year-old Kennedy kept a diary during this time, in which he recorded his views on world politics, predicted the onset of the Cold War, and shared his thoughts about his decision to run for Congress.

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