Brian Morris

co-Host Morning Edition, Reporter

Brian Morris began working with WCAI in 2005 as an independent reporter/producer, and joined the staff full time in December, 2013. He has contributed to the station's “Creative Life” series, produced the “Nautical Minutes” series of :60 vignettes about nautical life on the Cape and Islands, reported on South Coast issues, and provided field production support for "The Point." He is co-host of WCAI's Morning Edition.

Ways to Connect

Cape Cod Times

WCAI's Brian Morris hosts the Weekly News Roundup, a look at some of the top stories of the week.

File photo, Flickr

Carlos Rafael, a New Bedford-based fisherman who owned, operated and controlled much of the region’s fishing fleet, pleaded guilty to dozens of federal fraud, conspiracy and tax evasion charges Thursday. The fishing mogul now faces up to 6-and-a-half years in prison.

Around New Bedford, Rafael is known as the ‘Codfather.’ The 64-year-old Portuguese immigrant built a remarkable business, with more than 40 boats at his disposal. His business was so robust, Rafael was allowed to catch about 25 percent of all of the fish New England’s fishermen may bring ashore each season.

Brian Morris/WCAI

Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous professions in America. Consider this statistic: in the ten years from 2000 to 2010, 170 commercial fishermen in the U.S. lost their lives by falling overboard. To help reduce the number of fatalities in our region, a safety and survival training program is going on, designed to teach fishermen what to do during emergencies on their vessels. 

Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen's Alliance

The Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance is launching an effort this summer to try to get consumers to develop a taste for two under-appreciated fish species.

Whitfield-Manjiro Friendship Society

In 1841, a 14-year old Japanese boy named Manjiro and four others set out on a fishing trip. After getting caught in a fierce storm, their boat lost its mast, stranding the boys on a remote island where they survived – barely – for six months.

Chatham Historical Society

In May, 1915, a German U-boat sank the ocean liner Lusitania, killing almost 1,200 people and causing great alarm throughout the U-S shipping industry, where vessels were suddenly vulnerable up and down the Atlantic seaboard. The government responded by setting up a series of air stations along the east coast to defend against the growing threat. One of these facilities was built on a flat, 20-acre site in North Chatham.

New Bedford Whaling Museum

The 19th century was a time of numerous rebellions in Ireland, most of them unsuccessful. Many Irish rebels were taken prisoner and sent by their British captors to the notoriously squalid Fremantle Prison in Australia – a fate regarded as essentially a death sentence.

Dan Tritle

WCAI's Brian Morris talks to local journalists about some of the top news stories of the week.  His guests include Cynthia McCormick of the Cape Cod Times; Sara Brown with the Vineyard Gazette; Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle; Josh Balling of the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror; Ed Miller from the Provincetown Banner; Jim DeArruda of the New Bedford Standard Times; and Barry Stringfellow of the Martha's Vineyard Times.

The unemployment rate in New Bedford fell dramatically last year – down nearly 3 percentage points from 6.5 to 3.7 percent. It’s the largest unemployment decline among 387 metropolitan areas in the U-S over the past year. 

Morning Edition co-host Brian Morris spoke with New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell to talk about what the new statistic means, and how the city hopes to sustain that momentum going forward.

Until recently, teens on the South Coast needing mental health support had to drive more than 40 miles for services. Now, a new 24-bed mental health facility in Dartmouth is providing much-needed support for teens aged 13 to 17. Brian Morris speaks with Kevin Birchill, Chief Executive Officer at South Coast Behavioral Health, to learn more.

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