Brian Morris

co-Host Morning Edition, Reporter

Brian Morris began working with WCAI in 2005 as an independent reporter/producer, and joined the staff full time in December, 2013. He has contributed to the station's “Creative Life” series, produced the “Nautical Minutes” series of :60 vignettes about nautical life on the Cape and Islands, reported on South Coast issues, and provided field production support for "The Point." He is co-host of WCAI's Morning Edition.

Ways to Connect

Alecia Orsini/WCAI

The Justice Department in recent months has directed local police to hold detained immigrants until federal immigration officials arrive. But some cities in Massachusetts won’t comply unless the immigrant is wanted for a serious crime. Not everyone agrees on which is the right approach, and the debate has focused new attention on so-called sanctuary cities.

Woods Hole Historical Museum

Though barely a trace remains today, the Pacific Guano Company operated for 26 years on what is now Penzance Point in Woods Hole, transforming what was a sleepy farming village into a thriving community.

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Years before John F. Kennedy became the nation’s 35th President, he spent a brief time as a journalist for Hearst Newspapers, witnessing a number of pivotal moments in U.S. history in the aftermath of World War Two.

The 28-year-old Kennedy kept a diary during this time, in which he recorded his views on world politics, predicted the onset of the Cold War, and shared his thoughts about his decision to run for Congress.

Cape Cod Times

WCAI's Brian Morris hosts the Weekly News Roundup, a look at some of the top stories of the week.

File photo, Flickr

Carlos Rafael, a New Bedford-based fisherman who owned, operated and controlled much of the region’s fishing fleet, pleaded guilty to dozens of federal fraud, conspiracy and tax evasion charges Thursday. The fishing mogul now faces up to 6-and-a-half years in prison.

Around New Bedford, Rafael is known as the ‘Codfather.’ The 64-year-old Portuguese immigrant built a remarkable business, with more than 40 boats at his disposal. His business was so robust, Rafael was allowed to catch about 25 percent of all of the fish New England’s fishermen may bring ashore each season.

Brian Morris/WCAI

Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous professions in America. Consider this statistic: in the ten years from 2000 to 2010, 170 commercial fishermen in the U.S. lost their lives by falling overboard. To help reduce the number of fatalities in our region, a safety and survival training program is going on, designed to teach fishermen what to do during emergencies on their vessels. 

Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen's Alliance

The Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance is launching an effort this summer to try to get consumers to develop a taste for two under-appreciated fish species.

Whitfield-Manjiro Friendship Society

In 1841, a 14-year old Japanese boy named Manjiro and four others set out on a fishing trip. After getting caught in a fierce storm, their boat lost its mast, stranding the boys on a remote island where they survived – barely – for six months.

Chatham Historical Society

In May, 1915, a German U-boat sank the ocean liner Lusitania, killing almost 1,200 people and causing great alarm throughout the U-S shipping industry, where vessels were suddenly vulnerable up and down the Atlantic seaboard. The government responded by setting up a series of air stations along the east coast to defend against the growing threat. One of these facilities was built on a flat, 20-acre site in North Chatham.

New Bedford Whaling Museum

The 19th century was a time of numerous rebellions in Ireland, most of them unsuccessful. Many Irish rebels were taken prisoner and sent by their British captors to the notoriously squalid Fremantle Prison in Australia – a fate regarded as essentially a death sentence.

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