Ali Berlow

Ali Berlow

This is one of those stories about a hometown kid who grows up, moves away to go live the world, and then, after a few years of adventures and figuring it all out, the young man returns home to his roots. "Home" in this story is New Bedford, and the kid’s name is Brandon Roderick.

keepps goo.gl/TBgpu6 / goo.gl/lrxVf4

Elspeth Hay: Almost every week, late Friday or early Saturday, my house runs out of milk. We belong to a milk co-op; each Sunday a different local family takes turns driving to Dartmouth and bringing back milk for every family in the group. The amount we get is the closest to what we need, but it doesn't always last us until the following Sunday. 

Photo by Ali Berlow

  Rukia Bilal arrived in the states as a Somali-Bantu refugee when she was 14 years old. Today she's farming at the Flats Mentor Farm, a program of World Farmers in Lancaster, MA. As a successful beginning farmer, she's looking to expand her business to include selling her produce to grocers, and farmers' markets and making and selling her homemade  sambusas. 

 

 

 

Ali Berlow

Allen Healy and his wife Caitlin Jones run Mermaid Farm and Dairy in Chilmark with their brood: two boys and a couple of border collies, who mostly keep the herds of sheep and cows in line - the pigs, too, if and when they get out - and any people who come by the farmstand for vegetables, grains, yogurt, lassis, raw milk, cheese and meat.

Ali Berlow

Households in America account for 27 million tons of food waste a year. That's at an annual cost between $1,500 - $2,500 for an average family of four. Another one million tons a year of organic waste, like food scraps, also ends up in landfills.

According to WCAI’s science editor, Heather Goldstone, food waste is the single largest component of our trash and a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. Like methane.

Sophie Abrams

Nationwide, household food waste accounts for 27 million tons a year, and businesses like restaurants and grocers add another 25 million tons.

And another one million tons of food waste comes from manufacturing plants, like from a soup company, for example – the peelings and trimmings or a batch gone wrong – all that also gets thrown into the landfills.

Photograph by Jocelyn Filley, courtesy of Edible Vineyard

After Rick Karney makes a public appearance, or gives a talk, the audience lingers. People wait around wanting to speak with him. They’ll even follow him out of the building. I’ve seen it happen over and over again. He doesn’t get the nickname “The Elvis of Shellfish” for nothing.

Ali Berlow

On the Local Food Report we’ve been thinking a lot about the why: why we make this show every week. Since we started in 2008 we’ve learned a lot about our local harvest, activism, and traditions. But we wanted to remind listeners why we’re interested in covering local food in the first place. So we asked co-hosts Elspeth Hay and Ali Berlow to give us their motivations.

Photo by Ali Berlow

Duck eggs are an underutilized, often unrecognized and an underestimated local food. But they're mighty! Just as wonderful as fresh-from-the-farm chicken eggs, and especially good in baking. Meet Jefferson Munroe, a farmer on Martha's Vineyard, who is raising a flock of ducks specifically for their eggs and...for fun.

 

Photo by Ali Berlow

 

There are many paths to becoming a farmer. Some find it after returning home from war and tours of duty. Veteran Tom Rancich, a retired Navy SEAL on Martha’s Vineyard, shares his story about raising animals, adjusting to civilian life and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Pages