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The Two-Way
5:49 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

Obama Says 'James Flacco.' The Internet Says, Thank You

Actor James Franco (left), seen here with The Interview co-star Seth Rogen, was called "James Flacco" by President Obama Friday. Afterward, the jokes poured in.
Getty Images

It was an honest mistake. But when President Obama meant to talk about James Franco and instead said "James Flacco" — on a Friday marking the full-on start of the holidays, no less — the slip was eagerly received by people on Twitter and elsewhere.

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Latin America
5:12 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

Cubans Eager For More Economic Investment

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Ed
5:04 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

The Fate Of The Administration's College Ratings

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 6:10 pm

Today, details of the Obama administration's plan known as the Postsecondary Institutional Ratings System, or PIRS, finally saw the light of day. The idea, in this incarnation, was just under three years old.

The president announced its conception during his State of the Union address in 2012.

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Global Health
5:00 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

CDC Head: Key Interventions Have Slowed Ebola's Spread

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 5:04 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
4:50 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

New EPA Standards Label Toxic Coal Ash Non-Hazardous

Smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont., in September. New EPA guidelines treat toxic coal ash from such plants much the same as common household garbage.
Matt Brown AP

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 5:50 pm

The Environmental Protection Agency has issued new national standards designating coal ash – a nearly ubiquitous byproduct of coal-fired power plants that contains arsenic and lead – as non-hazardous waste.

NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that coal-fired power plants produce more than 130 million tons of the coal ash each year and they have long stored millions of tons of it in giant ponds.

But many of those ponds have failed in recent years, allowing contaminated water to get into rivers and streams, and ultimately into drinking water.

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Commentary
4:43 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

Week In Politics: Jeb Bush, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Cuba

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 5:04 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movies
4:43 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

'Mr. Turner' About A Man Trying To Find His Place In The World

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 5:04 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Movie Reviews
4:43 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

'Mr. Turner' Is A Snuffling, Growling Work Of Art

Timothy Spall finds beauty in the unlikeliest places as painter J.M.W. Turner.
Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 5:04 pm

If you picture landscape painting as a delicate, ethereal, pristine process involving an easel on a hillside and a sunset, Mr. Turner will be an eye-opener.

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Parallels
4:43 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

With A Presidential Vote, Tunisia Seeks A Peaceful Transition

A woman votes in the first round of the Tunisian presidential election on Nov. 23. The election went smoothly, but no candidate won 50 percent of a vote, forcing a run-off between the top two on Sunday.
Hassene Dridi AP

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 5:04 pm

The main boulevard in the capital Tunis is alive with political debate about the two candidates for president in this Sunday's election.

In one tent, campaign workers play music and hand out fliers for Beji Caid Essebsi, an 88-year-old candidate who held posts in the old regime and then served as an interim prime minister after the country's revolution in 2011.

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Law
4:43 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

FBI Officially Pins Sony Cyberattack On North Korea

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 6:10 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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