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beinghear.com

On The Point, filmmaker Matt Mikkelsen talks about his film Being Hear, and the work of acoustic ecologist Gordon Hempton, who is working to protect the few remaining quiet places on earth from noise pollution. The film is part of the Sea Change Film Series at Wellfleet Harbor Actor's Theater, and will be screened on April 22. 

 

 

 

  

coastalstudies.org

Only 524 North Atlantic right whales remain on the Planet, plus four calves who were born this season. On The Point, we talk with scientists from the Center for Coastal Studies about efforts to monitor and protect the species, including ways to minimize ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear. We also discuss the recent spate of dolphin strandings in Cape Cod Bay.

keepps goo.gl/TBgpu6 / goo.gl/lrxVf4

Elspeth Hay: Almost every week, late Friday or early Saturday, my house runs out of milk. We belong to a milk co-op; each Sunday a different local family takes turns driving to Dartmouth and bringing back milk for every family in the group. The amount we get is the closest to what we need, but it doesn't always last us until the following Sunday. 

caryinstitute.org

As the weather warms we’re likely to find ticks on ourselves and our pets. New research indicates that ticks in our region carry four other pathogens in addition to Lyme Disease. On The Point, we talk about the ecology of ticks and ways to prevent being bitten. We also discuss a new testing program for ticks that helps define treatment options for those bitten and betters our understanding of how and when tick borne diseases manifest and spread.

Laura Gooch goo.gl/jSp3Gw / goo.gl/lrxVf4

April is the month on the Cape and Islands where spring starts to tease us. While we get some token 50 degree days, we’re forced to chuckle at the reports of 70 or even 80 degree weather from the Boston news stations – those mainlanders know a different kind of spring than we do. Their trees leaf out weeks earlier than ours, which are held back by the cold, wet embrace of the ocean water surrounding us. 

garden beth goo.gl/tQKPo8 / goo.gl/uk4xos

An end-of-day walk on Nauset Beach provides Robert Finch an opportunity to wonder anew at the Cape's beauty, in this week's Cape Cod Notebook.

Lots of migrant birds are back, including osprey. They're busy with courtship and nesting and can be found by the observant birder listening for their calls. On The Point, Mark Faherty, ornithologist and science coordinator at Mass Audubon's Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary joins Mindy Todd to share the latest Bird News as spring arrives finally on the Cape, Coast and Islands. 

UMass Amherst College of Natural Sciences

Spring is in full gear, and in addition to more daylight, warmer temperatures, and blooming plants, ticks are back on the prowl.

Japanese barberry is an invasive that will likely benefit from climate change.
Wikicommons

Surveys consistently show that a majority of Americans think climate change is happening, but that it won’t affect them. Scientists say otherwise. Researchers already are seeing impacts - often dramatic, sometimes counterintuitive - on both natural systems and human communities. And, while everyone will be affected, some will be hit sooner and harder.

EVATAR (that's 'Eve', plus 'avatar') is a model of the human female reproductive tract.
Northwestern University, funding from National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

This month's rundown of the biggest science news spans fisheries management, some mind-bending biomedical advances, and evidence that it's harder than ever to understand scientific papers. Here's the skinny from Nature Podcast co-host Kerri Smith:

Or you can read it for yourself:

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