News

Why Words Matter

19 hours ago

On The Point, we talk about the practice of non-violent communication, and why the words we choose make a real difference.  There are a number of issues dividing our nation, and much of the dialogue around those issues serves to divide us even further.

Mark Faherty

When it comes to late winter on Cape Cod, and the knowledge that beach weather is still four months away, it’s the little signs of better things to come that keep you going. If you are paying attention to the birds around you every day, you should be brimming with hope, because they clearly are, too.

It used to be that age was an advantage when seeking a leadership position: it meant more experience, resources and money. But that’s changing. Individuals in their 20’s and 30’s are seen as more in the in tune with the dynamic, entrepreneurial and digital world, and they are stepping up to take the reins. We talk with young leaders from the public, private, and non profit sectors about their motivations, challenges and goals for themselves and our world.

JJ Losier / bit.ly/2BpVi90 / Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

I had a pretty happy childhood, all things considered.  Actually, most children growing up in America in the early 1950s experienced a general sense of well-being – that is, if you were white and not poor.

Alex Knight / bit.ly/2HrMhgq

The PyeongChang Olympics are likely to be remembered for the joint Korean team, wind delays, and robots. Yes, robots. South Korea is taking advantage of the international spotlight to show off its leadership in robotics, with eleven different types of robots – eighty five, in all – in action at the Olympics. And that’s not counting the swarm of drones featured in the Opening Ceremonies.

wikimedia commons

A news organization called Climate Home News this week obtained, and then published, a draft of a UN climate science report. The report assesses the feasibility and likely benefits of achieving the most ambitious goal set by the Paris climate agreement – which is to hold total global average warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. The conclusion is that it will be difficult to cut emissions quickly enough.

themozhi / bit.ly/2C5OjmO / Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

  MIT is the latest in a string of prestigious universities to reveal ties to slavery that go back to the founding of the institution. The information comes from an undergraduate research course called “MIT and Slavery.” 

David Clode / bit.ly/2C5mWcv

 

Congress averted a second government shutdown by passing a bipartisan budget deal that raised spending caps for the next two years, but didn’t specify how the money should be spent. That came a few days later when President Trump released his budget proposal for 2019.

In the Ocean's Twilight Zone: Seeing With Sound

Feb 19, 2018
Photo Courtesy of Dr. Andone Lavery. October 2017

Dr. Andone Lavery is changing the way we understand our oceans through sound. She and her department at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute are using a form of echolocation to map parts of the ocean, giving us better insight into underwater ecosystems. Over the summer, Lavery became the first woman to win the Walter Munk Award for her innovative research.

Poetry Sunday: Mary Bergman

Feb 18, 2018

Mary Bergman reads her poem, "How many more hurricanes do you think I have in me?"

WCAI News Director Steve Junker hosts a roundup of some of the top local and regional news of the week. His guests include: Cindy McCormick of the Cape Cod Times, Sara Brown of the Vineyard Gazette, Tim Wood of the Cape Cod Chronicle, Josh Balling of the Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror, Ed Miller of the Provincetown Banner, George Brennan of the Martha's Vineyard Times, and Andy Tomolonis of South Coast Today.

Joe Navas / Organic Photography

There are lots of opportunities to be inspired this weekend: a concert that helps others, the opportunity to try out an Olympic sport, an exhibit with both poetry and art, and theatre that's produced really, really quickly. Here's your Weekend Outlook. 

Opioid addiction and overdose are national public health emergencies that touch people from every walk of life. On the point, we discuss the diverse and evolving array of drugs that are now driving the addiction crisis, and some of the next steps we must take to prevent more people from becoming addicted and dying.

We talk about what contributed to the start of the epidemic, and if changes to opioid prescribing guidelines have had an impact.

Ali Berlow

Households in America account for 27 million tons of food waste a year. That's at an annual cost between $1,500 - $2,500 for an average family of four. Another one million tons a year of organic waste, like food scraps, also ends up in landfills.

According to WCAI’s science editor, Heather Goldstone, food waste is the single largest component of our trash and a major source of greenhouse gas emissions. Like methane.

nausetschools.org

Each year students from all across the Cape convene to identify human rights injustices. Students then return to their communities to develop and implement ways to address the injustice. On The Point, we talk with students about their experiences in the Academy and some of the projects and events they’ve organized in response to human rights injustice here and around the world. 

Pages