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Newly arrived from Moscow, just hours after cutting short his diplomatic visit to Russia, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte stepped behind a lectern to explain his decision to declare martial law in the southern island of Mindanao.

With his right hand raised, Duterte made a stark pledge.

"If I think you should die, you will die. If you fight us, you will die. If there's an open defiance, you will die. And if it means many people dying, so be it," Duterte said at the news conference Wednesday. "That's how it is."

Early Tuesday morning I awoke to the horrific news of the Manchester terror attack. A suspected suicide bomber killed at least 22 people and injured dozens more at an Ariana Grande concert.

I must admit that I don't know Ariana Grande or her music, but since then I have learned that she has a large fan base of female teens and tweens. So I now wonder: Was this attack a deliberate attempt to silence those young women and girls enjoying themselves at a concert?

Sister Rosemary is a one-woman army in the fight against trafficking

23 hours ago
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Edward Echwalu

When Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe was first assigned to be director of Saint Monica’s Girls' Vocational School in 2002, a Catholic mission in the northern Ugandan city of Gulu, she was a little worried. She was supposed to teach tailoring to 300 girls and, frankly, she didn’t know the first thing about sewing. When she got there, she found that sewing was the least of her concerns.

How to talk to your kids about terrorism

23 hours ago

As a parent, I can’t begin to imagine the fear, sorrow and nerve-racking anguish families felt during the Manchester attack. It is gut-wrenching to know that parents of children in civil-war-torn Syria face similar horrors, as do the families of ISIS victims in many Muslim-majority nations. No matter where, violence is unconscionable, unjustifiable and makes no sense. For parents, the loss of a child has to be the hardest of trials.

There are two conflicting narratives emerging from the Philippines, where ISIS-style black flags now wave over parts of a provincial capital.

One is that ISIS has totally overrun Marawi, a city roughly the size of Akron, Ohio — a stunning victory for insurgents hell-bent on establishing the caliphate’s Asian outpost.

The other story, propagated by the Philippine military, is that “the armed men we are dealing with are not ISIS” but rather “a local terrorist group.”

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos was on the Hill today defending the president’s 2018 budget request before a House appropriations subcommittee. The White House has proposed cutting or shrinking more than 30 federal education programs, shaving more than 13 percent off the overall budget. That’s the biggest proposed cut to the department’s discretionary funding since the Reagan administration. And there’s a lesson in that history about the reality of presidential budgets.

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Kai Ryssdal

There's finally a price tag on the amended American Health Care Act that was passed by the House of Representatives almost three weeks ago. The report from the Congressional Budget Office is sort of like the report card for the bill. It explains what it’s going to do and how much it’s going to cost.

Online shopping is sometimes just that — shopping. The actual buying happens later — in an actual store. Until now, retailers haven’t been able to connect those dots. Google says it has a tool that will let them connect online clicks to in-store buys. Good for Google, which may be able to sell more search ads. But maybe not so good for us. 

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Kai Ryssdal

Arguably no company has done more for the cause of digital money than PayPal. But after Venmo, where does PayPal take our money next? And more importantly, how does it keep that money safe? Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal spoke to PayPal CEO Dan Schulman and got some answers about cybersecurity and the digitization of money. An edited transcript of their conversation is below. 

Trump's NATO visit is going to be awkward

May 24, 2017

President Trump has arrived in Brussels on the latest leg of his first official foreign trip since his election. Apart from meeting European leaders, he will visit NATO’s shiny new headquarters in the Belgian capital. This could be a tricky visit. During the election campaign, Trump was not overly complimentary about the alliance.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

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