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For some time we’ve heard that American manufacturing is in long-term decline — and that’s true, at least in terms of how many people it employs and how much of what we consume is made here. But manufacturing has rebounded since the recession, and there are lots of lean, mean, technology-driven manufacturers thriving all over country. Yet employers increasingly complain they can’t find enough skilled workers to meet current demand and grow. A new report says the industry could help itself a huge amount by doing one thing: hiring more women.

The body of Associate Judge Sheila Abdus-Salaam, the first African-American woman to be appointed to New York's Court of Appeals, was found dead in the Hudson River on April 12.

At first, clues led authorities to believe she had committed suicide: There appeared to be no signs of trauma on her body, she was fully clothed and there were no obvious signs that a crime had taken place.

The word 'Trump' may be shifting our ideological attitudes

14 hours ago
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David Brancaccio

Since late 2015, we’ve been tracking Americans' economic anxiety levels through the Marketplace-Edison Research Poll.

Just before Election Day last fall, our poll showed that we were experiencing increased levels of economic anxiety. But how is the country feeling now? Larry Rosin, president of Edison Research, joined us to talk about which results were surprising, how people perceive President Trump's tweets, and what Americans value most in a job. Below is an edited transcript.

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Kai Ryssdal

He likes to say he inherited a mess, but, economically at least, President Trump was dealt a pretty good hand when he was inaugurated. 

The American economy’s been adding jobs for the past 78 months — six and a half years — as just one big indicator. And while the overall macro-economic numbers aren’t going gangbusters, they’re generally solid and consumer confidence is strong.

But.

There’s a disconnect.

04/24/2017: How is America's economic anxiety?

15 hours ago
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Marketplace

There's been a big shake-up in Europe. Two outsiders have taken the lead in France's presidential election: Centrist Emmanuel Macron and the far-right nationalist Marine Le Pen. We'll look at how the news has affected global markets, and what France's election could mean for them in the coming weeks. And in news across the pond, we'll examine the latest results from our Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, which finds that nearly three-quarters of Americans — regardless of party — feel the government in Washington has forgotten them.

04/24/2017: Our fascination with dystopian futures

15 hours ago
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Marketplace

Science fiction novels are getting the Hollywood treatment. Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale" is coming to Netflix, while Dave Eggers' "The Circle" will hit the big screen later this week. Amy Webb, futurist and head of the Future Today Institute, explains why we seem to be so into dystopian fiction right now. Afterwards, we'll look at the meaning behind the word "hacktivism," and get a brief history of the term from Chester Wisniewski, a cybersecurity researcher for Sophos. 

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RAY SUAREZ, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RAY SUAREZ, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RAY SUAREZ, HOST:

A couple of years ago, Kiev business journalist Yuliya Savostina decided to try an experiment: to spend a year living off food and other goods produced exclusively in Ukraine.

Inspired by the local food movement in the United States, Savostina started a blog to document her experience. She didn't expect it to last very long.

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